Levels of Free Fatty Acids (FFA) are associated with insulin resistance but do not explain the relationship between adiposity and insulin resistance in hispanic americans: The IRAS family study

Melissa R. Miller, Rocio I. Pereira, Carl D. Langefeld, Carlos Lorenzo, Jerome I. Rotter, Yii Der Ida Chen, Richard N. Bergman, Lynne E. Wagenknecht, Jill M. Norris, Tasha E. Fingerlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Context and Objective: We investigated whether free fatty acids (FFA) mediate the association between adiposity and insulin resistance in the Hispanic-American families of the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study. Design: In 815 Hispanic individuals in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study, we tested for association between the following: 1) levels of adiposity [body mass index (BMI), visceral and sc adipose tissue area (VAT and SAT)] and circulating levels of FFA; 2) levels of circulating FFA and insulin sensitivity (SI); and 3) levels of adiposity and S I, additionally testing to see whether levels of FFA mediated or modified the relationship between adiposity and SI. Results: After adjusting for age, sex, clinic site, and admixture, increasing levels of BMI, VAT, and SAT were weakly associated with increasing levels of circulating FFA (BMI: P = 0.024; VAT: P =2.33 × 10-3; SAT: P = 0.018; percent variation explained: ∼1.00%). Increasing levels of circulating FFA were associated with decreasing SI (P = 8.10 × 10-11). Increasing BMI, VAT, and SAT were also associated with decreasing SI (BMI: P = 4.98 × 10-71; VAT: P = 1.48 × 10-64; SAT: P = 4.21 × 10-62), but this relationship was not significantly mediated by FFA. VAT, but not BMI or SAT, interacts with levels of FFA to influence SI (P = 0.021). Conclusions: Although levels of circulating FFA are associated both with increasing adiposity and decreasing SI, they do not appear to mediate the association between levels of adiposity and SI in this large cohort of Hispanic-Americans. These results may indicate that FFA contribute to insulin resistance independent of adiposity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3285-3291
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume97
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

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Adiposity
Hispanic Americans
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Insulin Resistance
Insulin
Body Mass Index
Atherosclerosis
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Tissue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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Levels of Free Fatty Acids (FFA) are associated with insulin resistance but do not explain the relationship between adiposity and insulin resistance in hispanic americans : The IRAS family study. / Miller, Melissa R.; Pereira, Rocio I.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Lorenzo, Carlos; Rotter, Jerome I.; Chen, Yii Der Ida; Bergman, Richard N.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Norris, Jill M.; Fingerlin, Tasha E.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 97, No. 9, 09.2012, p. 3285-3291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, Melissa R. ; Pereira, Rocio I. ; Langefeld, Carl D. ; Lorenzo, Carlos ; Rotter, Jerome I. ; Chen, Yii Der Ida ; Bergman, Richard N. ; Wagenknecht, Lynne E. ; Norris, Jill M. ; Fingerlin, Tasha E. / Levels of Free Fatty Acids (FFA) are associated with insulin resistance but do not explain the relationship between adiposity and insulin resistance in hispanic americans : The IRAS family study. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2012 ; Vol. 97, No. 9. pp. 3285-3291.
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abstract = "Context and Objective: We investigated whether free fatty acids (FFA) mediate the association between adiposity and insulin resistance in the Hispanic-American families of the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study. Design: In 815 Hispanic individuals in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study, we tested for association between the following: 1) levels of adiposity [body mass index (BMI), visceral and sc adipose tissue area (VAT and SAT)] and circulating levels of FFA; 2) levels of circulating FFA and insulin sensitivity (SI); and 3) levels of adiposity and S I, additionally testing to see whether levels of FFA mediated or modified the relationship between adiposity and SI. Results: After adjusting for age, sex, clinic site, and admixture, increasing levels of BMI, VAT, and SAT were weakly associated with increasing levels of circulating FFA (BMI: P = 0.024; VAT: P =2.33 × 10-3; SAT: P = 0.018; percent variation explained: ∼1.00{\%}). Increasing levels of circulating FFA were associated with decreasing SI (P = 8.10 × 10-11). Increasing BMI, VAT, and SAT were also associated with decreasing SI (BMI: P = 4.98 × 10-71; VAT: P = 1.48 × 10-64; SAT: P = 4.21 × 10-62), but this relationship was not significantly mediated by FFA. VAT, but not BMI or SAT, interacts with levels of FFA to influence SI (P = 0.021). Conclusions: Although levels of circulating FFA are associated both with increasing adiposity and decreasing SI, they do not appear to mediate the association between levels of adiposity and SI in this large cohort of Hispanic-Americans. These results may indicate that FFA contribute to insulin resistance independent of adiposity.",
author = "Miller, {Melissa R.} and Pereira, {Rocio I.} and Langefeld, {Carl D.} and Carlos Lorenzo and Rotter, {Jerome I.} and Chen, {Yii Der Ida} and Bergman, {Richard N.} and Wagenknecht, {Lynne E.} and Norris, {Jill M.} and Fingerlin, {Tasha E.}",
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T1 - Levels of Free Fatty Acids (FFA) are associated with insulin resistance but do not explain the relationship between adiposity and insulin resistance in hispanic americans

T2 - The IRAS family study

AU - Miller, Melissa R.

AU - Pereira, Rocio I.

AU - Langefeld, Carl D.

AU - Lorenzo, Carlos

AU - Rotter, Jerome I.

AU - Chen, Yii Der Ida

AU - Bergman, Richard N.

AU - Wagenknecht, Lynne E.

AU - Norris, Jill M.

AU - Fingerlin, Tasha E.

PY - 2012/9

Y1 - 2012/9

N2 - Context and Objective: We investigated whether free fatty acids (FFA) mediate the association between adiposity and insulin resistance in the Hispanic-American families of the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study. Design: In 815 Hispanic individuals in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study, we tested for association between the following: 1) levels of adiposity [body mass index (BMI), visceral and sc adipose tissue area (VAT and SAT)] and circulating levels of FFA; 2) levels of circulating FFA and insulin sensitivity (SI); and 3) levels of adiposity and S I, additionally testing to see whether levels of FFA mediated or modified the relationship between adiposity and SI. Results: After adjusting for age, sex, clinic site, and admixture, increasing levels of BMI, VAT, and SAT were weakly associated with increasing levels of circulating FFA (BMI: P = 0.024; VAT: P =2.33 × 10-3; SAT: P = 0.018; percent variation explained: ∼1.00%). Increasing levels of circulating FFA were associated with decreasing SI (P = 8.10 × 10-11). Increasing BMI, VAT, and SAT were also associated with decreasing SI (BMI: P = 4.98 × 10-71; VAT: P = 1.48 × 10-64; SAT: P = 4.21 × 10-62), but this relationship was not significantly mediated by FFA. VAT, but not BMI or SAT, interacts with levels of FFA to influence SI (P = 0.021). Conclusions: Although levels of circulating FFA are associated both with increasing adiposity and decreasing SI, they do not appear to mediate the association between levels of adiposity and SI in this large cohort of Hispanic-Americans. These results may indicate that FFA contribute to insulin resistance independent of adiposity.

AB - Context and Objective: We investigated whether free fatty acids (FFA) mediate the association between adiposity and insulin resistance in the Hispanic-American families of the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study. Design: In 815 Hispanic individuals in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study, we tested for association between the following: 1) levels of adiposity [body mass index (BMI), visceral and sc adipose tissue area (VAT and SAT)] and circulating levels of FFA; 2) levels of circulating FFA and insulin sensitivity (SI); and 3) levels of adiposity and S I, additionally testing to see whether levels of FFA mediated or modified the relationship between adiposity and SI. Results: After adjusting for age, sex, clinic site, and admixture, increasing levels of BMI, VAT, and SAT were weakly associated with increasing levels of circulating FFA (BMI: P = 0.024; VAT: P =2.33 × 10-3; SAT: P = 0.018; percent variation explained: ∼1.00%). Increasing levels of circulating FFA were associated with decreasing SI (P = 8.10 × 10-11). Increasing BMI, VAT, and SAT were also associated with decreasing SI (BMI: P = 4.98 × 10-71; VAT: P = 1.48 × 10-64; SAT: P = 4.21 × 10-62), but this relationship was not significantly mediated by FFA. VAT, but not BMI or SAT, interacts with levels of FFA to influence SI (P = 0.021). Conclusions: Although levels of circulating FFA are associated both with increasing adiposity and decreasing SI, they do not appear to mediate the association between levels of adiposity and SI in this large cohort of Hispanic-Americans. These results may indicate that FFA contribute to insulin resistance independent of adiposity.

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