Language barriers in pediatric care.

P. Holden, A. C. Serrano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Language differences between pediatrician and parents can create a barrier in the doctor-patient relationship. Use of a translator to overcome that barrier introduces other potential problems such as a diminished sense of privacy, inadequate data collection, and misinterpretation of medical or family history due to translator distortions. Physicians should carefully choose the translator, avoiding persons who are linguistically incompetent, culturally insensitive, and medically unsophisticated. Physicians also should avoid assuming that parents who "speak English" are fluent. A determination of their language preference and their degree of English proficiency may lead the pediatrician to use a translator even with partially fluent families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-194
Number of pages2
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume28
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1989

Fingerprint

Communication Barriers
Medical History Taking
Language
Parents
Pediatrics
Physicians
Privacy
Pediatricians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Holden, P., & Serrano, A. C. (1989). Language barriers in pediatric care. Clinical Pediatrics, 28(4), 193-194.

Language barriers in pediatric care. / Holden, P.; Serrano, A. C.

In: Clinical Pediatrics, Vol. 28, No. 4, 04.1989, p. 193-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Holden, P & Serrano, AC 1989, 'Language barriers in pediatric care.', Clinical Pediatrics, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 193-194.
Holden P, Serrano AC. Language barriers in pediatric care. Clinical Pediatrics. 1989 Apr;28(4):193-194.
Holden, P. ; Serrano, A. C. / Language barriers in pediatric care. In: Clinical Pediatrics. 1989 ; Vol. 28, No. 4. pp. 193-194.
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