Lack of methionine sulfoxide reductase A in mice increases sensitivity to oxidative stress but does not diminish life span

Adam B. Salmon, Viviana I. Pérez, Alex Bokov, Amanda Jernigan, Geumsoo Kim, Hang Zhao, Rodney L. Levine, Arlan Richardson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

96 Scopus citations

Abstract

Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) repairs oxidized methionine residues within proteins and may also function as a general antioxidant. Previous reports have suggested that modulation of MsrA in mice and mammalian cell culture can affect the accumulation of oxidized proteins and may regulate resistance to oxidative stress. Thus, under the oxidative stress theory of aging, these results would predict that MsrA regulates the aging process in mammals. We show here that MsrA-/- mice are more susceptible to oxidative stress induced by paraquat. Skin-derived fibroblasts do not express MsrA, but fibroblasts cultured from MsrA-/- mice were, nevertheless, also more susceptible to killing by various oxidative stresses. In contrast to previous reports, we find no evidence for neuromuscular dysfunction in MsrA -/- mice in either young adult or in older animals. Most important, we found no difference between MsrA-/- and control mice in either their median or maximum life span. Thus, our results show that MsrA regulates sensitivity to oxidative stress in mice but has no effect on aging, as determined by life span.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3601-3608
Number of pages8
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume23
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Antioxidant
  • Free radical
  • Longevity
  • Stress resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

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