Lack of effect of fetal administration of cocaine on maternal and fetal plasma adrenocorticotropin, cortisol and lactate concentrations at 127-138 days gestational age

J. R. Owiny, M. T. Jones, D. Sadowsky, A. Massmann, X. Y. Ding, P. W. Nathanielsz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Few in vivo studies have attempted to characterize the effects of cocaine on the maternal and fetal pituitary-adrenal axis during pregnancy. We, therefore, administered cocaine (2 mg·kg-1) intravenously to 6 fetal sheep at 127-138 days of gestation. There was a transient reduction in fetal arterial pO2 with a concomitant increase in pCO2 and a prolonged fall in pH (p < 0.05) following cocaine injection. No changes were seen in maternal pO2, pCO2 or pH. Maternal plasma adrenocorticotropin, cortisol and lactate were not affected by fetal administration of cocaine. Although there was a tendency for fetal plasma adrenocorticotropin, cortisol and lactate to rise after administering cocaine, the increases were not statistically significant. Previous studies have shown that cocaine administration to the ewe at a similar stage of pregnancy results in increased fetal plasma adrenocorticotropin concentrations. The results of the present study indicate that cocaine administration to the fetus compromises fetal gas exchange and acid base balance, but the effects on the fetal pituitary-adrenal axis are less pronounced than after maternal administration of cocaine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)196-199
Number of pages4
JournalGynecologic and Obstetric Investigation
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adenocorticotropin
  • Cocaine
  • Cortisol
  • Hypoxemia
  • Key Words
  • Lactate
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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