Knowledge, attitudes, and behavior related to obesity and dieting in mexican Americans and anglos: The san antonio heart study

Michael P. Stern, Jacqueline A Pugh, Sharon Parten Gaskill, Helen P Hazuda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An epidemiologic study was carried out on Mexican Americans and Angios residing in two socioeconomically and culturally distinct target areas in San Antonio: a middle income, ethnically integrated area ("transitional") and an upper income, predominantly Anglo area ("suburbs"). Although suburbanite Mexican Americans were leaner than their lower income counterparts, they were still more overweight than suburbanite Anglos. Even after adjusting for these differences in relative weight, however, Mexican Americans were still more likely than Anglos to express the opinion that Americans are too concerned about losing weight. Expressed as a per cent of the maximum score, Mexican American women in the transitional neighborhood scored 77% on this attitude item compared with 60% for Anglo women (p < 0.0005). Comparable ethnic differences on this attitude item were found in men in the transitional neighborhood and in suburbanites of both sexes. In the transitional neighborhood Mexican American women scored lower than Anglo women on a "sugar avoidance" and a "dieting behavior" scale: 23% for Mexican Americans and 45% for Anglos (p < 0.0005) on the "sugar avoidance" scale. Comparable ethnic differences on this scale were found for men in the transitional neighborhood and for both sexes on the "dieting behavior" scale. Although no ethnic differences on these behavioral scales were found in the more affluent suburbs, these results nevertheless have public health relevance because the majority of Mexican Americans in the United States are of low socioeconomic status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)917-928
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume115
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1982

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Obesity
Weights and Measures
Social Class
Epidemiologic Studies
Public Health

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Food habits
  • Mexican Americans
  • Obesity
  • Reducing
  • Sugars

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Knowledge, attitudes, and behavior related to obesity and dieting in mexican Americans and anglos : The san antonio heart study. / Stern, Michael P.; Pugh, Jacqueline A; Gaskill, Sharon Parten; Hazuda, Helen P.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 115, No. 6, 06.1982, p. 917-928.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stern, Michael P. ; Pugh, Jacqueline A ; Gaskill, Sharon Parten ; Hazuda, Helen P. / Knowledge, attitudes, and behavior related to obesity and dieting in mexican Americans and anglos : The san antonio heart study. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 1982 ; Vol. 115, No. 6. pp. 917-928.
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