Kinetic and cardiovascular effects of acute topiramate dosing among non-treatment-seeking, methamphetamine-dependent individuals

Bankole A. Johnson, Lynda T. Wells, John D Roache, Christopher L. Wallace, Nassima Ait-Daoud, Michael A Dawes, Lei Liu, Xin Qun Wang, Martin A Javors

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previously, we have shown that orally administered topiramate, a sulfamate-substituted fructopyranose derivative, appears to accentuate rather than diminish some aspects of methamphetamine-induced positive subjective mood and cognitive performance. One possible mechanism by which this might occur would be for topiramate to increase plasma methamphetamine level. Such an effect also would be expected to enhance methamphetamine-induced hemodynamic response. We, therefore, studied - in the same experiment from which the previous findings originated - the effects of topiramate on the kinetic profile and hemodynamic response to methamphetamine. In a 27-day inpatient study, 10 methamphetamine-dependent individuals participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design, with oral doses of topiramate (0, 100, and 200 mg) administered as a pretreatment before intravenous doses of methamphetamine (0, 15, and 30 mg). The 3 × 3 factorial combination of topiramate and methamphetamine resulted in a sequence of the nine treatments administered to each subject in an order determined by a 9 × 9 Latin Square design. Methamphetamine alone was associated with prototypical increases in hemodynamic response that were not altered in the presence of topiramate. While there was no significant kinetic interaction between topiramate and methamphetamine, there was a non-significant trend for topiramate to increase plasma methamphetamine level. No significant adverse events were reported. The combination of topiramate and methamphetamine at pharmacologically relevant doses appears to be safe. Larger laboratory studies with chronic dosing regimens are needed to establish whether or not there is a kinetic interaction between topiramate and methamphetamine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)455-461
Number of pages7
JournalProgress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 30 2007

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Methamphetamine
Hemodynamics
topiramate
Cross-Over Studies
Inpatients
Placebos

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Heart rate
  • Hemodynamic
  • Humans
  • Kinetic
  • Methamphetamine
  • Topiramate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Kinetic and cardiovascular effects of acute topiramate dosing among non-treatment-seeking, methamphetamine-dependent individuals. / Johnson, Bankole A.; Wells, Lynda T.; Roache, John D; Wallace, Christopher L.; Ait-Daoud, Nassima; Dawes, Michael A; Liu, Lei; Wang, Xin Qun; Javors, Martin A.

In: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 31, No. 2, 30.03.2007, p. 455-461.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, Bankole A. ; Wells, Lynda T. ; Roache, John D ; Wallace, Christopher L. ; Ait-Daoud, Nassima ; Dawes, Michael A ; Liu, Lei ; Wang, Xin Qun ; Javors, Martin A. / Kinetic and cardiovascular effects of acute topiramate dosing among non-treatment-seeking, methamphetamine-dependent individuals. In: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry. 2007 ; Vol. 31, No. 2. pp. 455-461.
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