Ipsapirone neuroendocrine challenge: Relationship to aggression as measured in the human laboratory

F. Gerard Moeller, Terry Allen, Don R. Cherek, Donald M. Dougherty, Scott Lane, Alan C. Swann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Thirty-one human subjects were administered a neuroendocrine challenge with the 5-HT(la) agonist ipsapirone after completing six sessions of a laboratory measure of aggression, the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm (c) (PSAP), in order to determine if a laboratory measure of aggression was related to serotonin function. Subjects who showed more aggressive responding on the PSAP (n = 11) had a significantly blunted temperature response to ipsapirone compared to those with less aggressive responding (n = 20). There was no difference between the two groups on the cortisol response to ipsapirone. This study supports a relationship between serotonin function and aggression as measured in the human laboratory, similar to the well- documented association between self-reported aggression and serotonin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-38
Number of pages8
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume81
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 19 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cortisol
  • Serotonin
  • Substance abuse
  • Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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