Involving significant others in the care of opioid-dependent patients receiving methadone

Michael Kidorf, Van L King, Karin Neufeld, Kenneth B. Stoller, Jessica Peirce, Robert K. Brooner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Positive, abstinence-oriented, social support is associated with good substance abuse treatment outcome but few interventions are designed to help patients improve their social supports. This article reports on a behavioral intervention designed to encourage opioid-dependent patients receiving methadone to include drug-free family members or friends in treatment and to use these individuals to facilitate development of a supportive, non-drug-using social network. This report uses data from a quality assurance program review of the treatment response of 59 opioid-dependent outpatients who identified a drug-free significant other to participate in their treatment. Fifty-five (93.2%) brought a significant other (most often the patient's mother, 29%) to both the initial evaluation session and at least one joint session. Social support activities were family- (33%), church- (28%), and self-help group-related (30%). Approximately 78% of patients who participated in the social support intervention achieved at least four consecutive weeks of abstinence. Women responded better than men. We conclude that methadone-maintained patients can and will include non-drug-using family members and friends in treatment, and these individuals can be mobilized to help patients improve their recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-27
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Substance Abuse Treatment
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Methadone
Opioid Analgesics
Social Support
Self-Help Groups
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Substance-Related Disorders
Outpatients
Joints
Mothers

Keywords

  • Adaptive treatment
  • Community reinforcement
  • Drug abuse
  • Significant other
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Involving significant others in the care of opioid-dependent patients receiving methadone. / Kidorf, Michael; King, Van L; Neufeld, Karin; Stoller, Kenneth B.; Peirce, Jessica; Brooner, Robert K.

In: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.07.2005, p. 19-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kidorf, Michael ; King, Van L ; Neufeld, Karin ; Stoller, Kenneth B. ; Peirce, Jessica ; Brooner, Robert K. / Involving significant others in the care of opioid-dependent patients receiving methadone. In: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. 2005 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 19-27.
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