Investigation of an IR analytical method for studying extracellular components of bacteria-colonized synthetic materials

Belinda G. Cantu, Virginia L. Thomas, Barbara A. Sanford, H. Ralph Rawls

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Staphylococcus epidermidis, a cocci that adheres to synthetic surfaces which produces an extracellular `biofilm' that protects them from antimicrobials and host's immune system. Since they are able to cling to almost any type of surface, the bacteria contaminate any implanted or indwelling device, and therefore lead to infection. The formation of the biofilms is investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to determine the factors that influence the extracellular biofilm layer's adherence to plastic, metal, and other materials that come in contact with biological tissue and fluids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
EventProceedings of the 1998 17th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - San Antonio, TX, USA
Duration: Feb 6 1998Feb 8 1998

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1998 17th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference
CitySan Antonio, TX, USA
Period2/6/982/8/98

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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    Cantu, B. G., Thomas, V. L., Sanford, B. A., & Rawls, H. R. (1998). Investigation of an IR analytical method for studying extracellular components of bacteria-colonized synthetic materials. Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1998 17th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, San Antonio, TX, USA, .