Intravenous magnesium sulfate does not increase ventricular CSF ionized magnesium concentration of patients with intracranial hypertension

Randall P. Brewer, Augusto Parra, Cecil O. Borel, Michael B. Hopkins, James D. Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Magnesium sulfate has attracted interest as a potential neuroprotectant but passage of magnesium ion into the central nervous system has not been well documented. For this study, we quantified plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ionized magnesium concentration after systemic magnesium sulfate infusion in patients with intracranial hypertension. Patients (N = 9) received an intravenous infusion of 5 g/20 mmol magnesium sulfate (125 mL of a 4% wt/vol solution) over 30 minutes. Before and after dosing, CSF (from an indwelling ventricular catheter) and blood samples were collected at hourly intervals. Ionized magnesium concentration in all samples was determined using an electrolyte analyzer. Baseline plasma and CSF ionized magnesium concentrations were 0.58 ± 0.05 and 0.82 ± 0.06 mmol/L, respectively. Intravenous magnesium sulfate infusion significantly increased plasma ionized magnesium concentration (peak, 0.89 ± 0.11 mmol/L), but CSF magnesium levels did not change during the 4-hour study. Systemic administration of magnesium sulfate failed to increase CSF ionized magnesium concentration in patients with intracranial hypertension despite increasing plasma magnesium levels by >50%.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-345
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Neuropharmacology
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Magnesium Sulfate
Intracranial Hypertension
Magnesium
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Indwelling Catheters
Neuroprotective Agents
Intravenous Infusions
Electrolytes
Central Nervous System
Ions

Keywords

  • Cerebrospinal fluid
  • Intracranial hypertension
  • Magnesium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Intravenous magnesium sulfate does not increase ventricular CSF ionized magnesium concentration of patients with intracranial hypertension. / Brewer, Randall P.; Parra, Augusto; Borel, Cecil O.; Hopkins, Michael B.; Reynolds, James D.

In: Clinical Neuropharmacology, Vol. 24, No. 6, 2001, p. 341-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brewer, Randall P. ; Parra, Augusto ; Borel, Cecil O. ; Hopkins, Michael B. ; Reynolds, James D. / Intravenous magnesium sulfate does not increase ventricular CSF ionized magnesium concentration of patients with intracranial hypertension. In: Clinical Neuropharmacology. 2001 ; Vol. 24, No. 6. pp. 341-345.
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