Interventions for High Body Mass Index in Children and Adolescents: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

Wanda K. Nicholson, Michael Silverstein, John B. Wong, David Chelmow, Tumaini Rucker Coker, Esa M. Davis, Katrina E. Donahue, Carlos Roberto Jaén, Marie Krousel-Wood, Sei Lee, Li Li, Goutham Rao, John M. Ruiz, James Stevermer, Joel Tsevat, Sandra Millon Underwood, Sarah Wiehe

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Importance: Approximately 19.7% of children and adolescents aged 2 to 19 years in the US have a body mass index (BMI) at or above the 95th percentile for age and sex, based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts from 2000. The prevalence of high BMI increases with age and is higher among Hispanic/Latino, Native American/Alaska Native, and non-Hispanic Black children and adolescents and children from lower-income families. Objective: The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) commissioned a systematic review to evaluate the evidence on interventions (behavioral counseling and pharmacotherapy) for weight loss or weight management in children and adolescents that can be provided in or referred from a primary care setting. Population: Children and adolescents 6 years or older. Evidence Assessment: The USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that providing or referring children and adolescents 6 years or older with a high BMI to comprehensive, intensive behavioral interventions has a moderate net benefit. Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends that clinicians provide or refer children and adolescents 6 years or older with a high BMI (≥95th percentile for age and sex) to comprehensive, intensive behavioral interventions. (B recommendation).

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJAMA
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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