International Urogynecology Consultation Chapter 1 Committee 5: relationship of pelvic organ prolapse to associated pelvic floor dysfunction symptoms: lower urinary tract, bowel, sexual dysfunction and abdominopelvic pain

Marie Andrée Harvey, Hui Ju Chih, Roxana Geoffrion, Baharak Amir, Alka Bhide, Pawel Miotla, Peter F.W.M. Rosier, Ifeoma Offiah, Manidip Pal, Alexandriah Nicole Alas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction and hypothesis: This article from Chapter 1 of the International Urogynecology Consultation (IUC) on Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP) establishes the prevalence of lower urinary tract disorders, bowel symptoms, vulvo-vaginal/lower abdominal/back pain and sexual dysfunction in women with POP. Methods: An international group of nine urogynecologists/urologists and one medical student performed a search of the literature using pre-specified search terms in Ovid, MEDLINE, Embase and CINAHL from January 2000 to March 2019. Publications were eliminated if not relevant or they did not include clear definitions of POP or the symptoms associated with POP. Definitions of POP needed to include both a physical examination finding using a validated examination technique and the complaint of a bothersome vaginal bulge. Symptoms were categorized into symptom groups for ease of evaluation. The Specialist Unit for Review Evidence (SURE) was used to evaluate for quality of the included articles. The resulting list of articles was used to determine the prevalence of various symptoms in women with POP. Cohort studies were used to evaluate for possible causation of POP as either causing or worsening the symptom category. Results: The original search yielded over 12,000 references, of which 50 were used. More than 50% of women with POP report lower urinary tract symptoms. Cohort studies suggest that women with POP have more obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms than women without POP. Pain described in various ways is frequently reported in women with POP, with low back pain being the most common pain symptom reported in 45% of women with POP. In cohort studies those with POP had more pain complaints than those without POP. Sexual dysfunction is reported by over half of women with POP and obstructed intercourse in 37–100% of women with POP. Approximately 40% of women have complaints of bowel symptoms. There was no difference in the median prevalence of bowel symptoms in those with and without POP in cohort studies. Conclusions: The prevalence of lower urinary tract disorders, bowel symptoms, vulvo-vaginal/lower abdominal/back pain and sexual dysfunction in women with POP are common but inconsistently reported. There are few data on incidence of associated symptoms with POP, and cohort studies evaluating causality are rare or inconsistent. Obstructive voiding, lower abdominal and pelvic pain, and sexual dysfunction are most frequently associated with POP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2575-2594
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Urogynecology Journal
Volume32
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • Abdomino-pelvic pain
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms
  • Lower urinary tract symptoms
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Prevalence
  • Sexual dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Urology

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