Inter-relations of orthostatic blood pressure change, aortic stiffness, and brain structure and function in young adults

Leroy L. Cooper, Jayandra J. Himali, Alyssa Torjesen, Connie W. Tsao, Alexa Beiser, Naomi M. Hamburg, Charles DeCarli, Ramachandran S. Vasan, Sudha Seshadri, Matthew P. Pase, Gary F. Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background--Relations of orthostatic change in blood pressure with brain structure and function have not been studied thoroughly, particularly in younger, healthier individuals. Elucidation of factors that contribute to early changes in brain integrity may lead to development of interventions that delay or prevent cognitive impairment. Methods and Results--In a sample of the Framingham Heart Study Third Generation (N=2119; 53% women; mean age±SD, 47±8 years), we assessed orthostatic change in mean arterial pressure (MAP), aortic stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), neuropsychological function, and markers of subclinical brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging. Multivariable regression analyses were used to assess relations between orthostatic change in MAP and brain structural and neuropsychological outcomes. Greater orthostatic increase in MAP on standing was related to better Trails B-A performance among participants aged < 49 years (β±SE, 0.062±0.029; P=0.031) and among participants with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity < 6.9 m/s (β±SE, 0.063±0.026; P=0.016). This relation was not significant among participants who were older or had stiffer aortas. Conversely, greater orthostatic increase in MAP was related to larger total brain volume among older participants (β±SE, 0.065±0.029; P=0.023) and among participants with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity ≥6.9 m/s (β±SE, 0.078±0.031; P=0.011). Conclusions--Blunted orthostatic increase in MAP was associated with smaller brain volume among participants who were older or had stiffer aortas and with poorer executive function among persons who were younger or who had more-elastic aortas. Our findings suggest that the brain is sensitive to orthostatic change in MAP, with results dependent on age and aortic stiffness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere006206
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume6
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vascular Stiffness
Young Adult
Arterial Pressure
Blood Pressure
Pulse Wave Analysis
Brain
Thigh
Aorta
Executive Function
Brain Injuries
Regression Analysis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Aortic stiffness
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Orthostatic hypotension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Cooper, L. L., Himali, J. J., Torjesen, A., Tsao, C. W., Beiser, A., Hamburg, N. M., ... Mitchell, G. F. (2017). Inter-relations of orthostatic blood pressure change, aortic stiffness, and brain structure and function in young adults. Journal of the American Heart Association, 6(8), [e006206]. https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.117.006206

Inter-relations of orthostatic blood pressure change, aortic stiffness, and brain structure and function in young adults. / Cooper, Leroy L.; Himali, Jayandra J.; Torjesen, Alyssa; Tsao, Connie W.; Beiser, Alexa; Hamburg, Naomi M.; DeCarli, Charles; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Seshadri, Sudha; Pase, Matthew P.; Mitchell, Gary F.

In: Journal of the American Heart Association, Vol. 6, No. 8, e006206, 01.08.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cooper, LL, Himali, JJ, Torjesen, A, Tsao, CW, Beiser, A, Hamburg, NM, DeCarli, C, Vasan, RS, Seshadri, S, Pase, MP & Mitchell, GF 2017, 'Inter-relations of orthostatic blood pressure change, aortic stiffness, and brain structure and function in young adults', Journal of the American Heart Association, vol. 6, no. 8, e006206. https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.117.006206
Cooper, Leroy L. ; Himali, Jayandra J. ; Torjesen, Alyssa ; Tsao, Connie W. ; Beiser, Alexa ; Hamburg, Naomi M. ; DeCarli, Charles ; Vasan, Ramachandran S. ; Seshadri, Sudha ; Pase, Matthew P. ; Mitchell, Gary F. / Inter-relations of orthostatic blood pressure change, aortic stiffness, and brain structure and function in young adults. In: Journal of the American Heart Association. 2017 ; Vol. 6, No. 8.
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AU - Tsao, Connie W.

AU - Beiser, Alexa

AU - Hamburg, Naomi M.

AU - DeCarli, Charles

AU - Vasan, Ramachandran S.

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AU - Pase, Matthew P.

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KW - Cognitive impairment

KW - Magnetic resonance imaging

KW - Orthostatic hypotension

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