Injuries in hiv-infected children compared to a general population of african-american children

B. J. Turner, R. Casey, R. Cocroft James, C. Christian, E. Gbson, T. R. Fanning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Because HIV+ children may be at increased risk of injury due to neurologic disease and their social environment we compared the rates of injuries for an HIV+ cohort in NYS to previously reported rates for African-American children from Philadelphia. Methode HIV+ children enrolled in NYS Medicaid and delivered by HIV+ women from 1985-90 were identified by a tested case finding method Clinicians specified ICD-9-CM codes for injuries and all unique injury events were identified from coded diagnoses from in- and out-patient claims for care of the HIV+ childreaWe calculated injury events per 100 child-years and compared these to reported rates for Philadelphia children (Schwarz DF et al. JAMA. 1994:271:755-60.} Results: 420 HIV+ children were studied, of whom 40.056 were African-American and 35.2% were LatinaThe rates of injuries/100 child-yrs. in children <24 mos. were 217 for the HIV+ cohort compared to 21.3 for the general cohort The rate of bums was lower for the HIV+ cohort than the general group ( 1.58 vs. 2.09/100 child-yrs, respectively). However; the rate of poisoning was higher for the HIV+ cohort than the general group (173 vs. 1.73/100 child-yrs.). Poisoning from medications in the HIV+ cohort constituted one-third of all poisonings (0.86/100 child-yrs.). Six HIV+ children in this age group had a diagnosis of child maltreatment which is highly suspicious for child abuse. Six additional HIV+ children suffered three or more injuries in their first two years. Conclusions:The overall rate of injuries in our cohort of HIV+ children is similar to the rate reported for a general inner city pédiatrie population but poisonings may be more common in HIV+ children. Clinicians should counsel parents and caregivers of HIV+ children regarding the poisoning risk. As for all children, providers should be diligent in detecting any signs of abuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375
Number of pages1
JournalPediatric AIDS and HIV Infection
Volume7
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

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African Americans
HIV
Wounds and Injuries
Population
Poisoning
Child Abuse
Social Environment
Medicaid
International Classification of Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Caregivers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Turner, B. J., Casey, R., Cocroft James, R., Christian, C., Gbson, E., & Fanning, T. R. (1996). Injuries in hiv-infected children compared to a general population of african-american children. Pediatric AIDS and HIV Infection, 7(5), 375.

Injuries in hiv-infected children compared to a general population of african-american children. / Turner, B. J.; Casey, R.; Cocroft James, R.; Christian, C.; Gbson, E.; Fanning, T. R.

In: Pediatric AIDS and HIV Infection, Vol. 7, No. 5, 1996, p. 375.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Turner, BJ, Casey, R, Cocroft James, R, Christian, C, Gbson, E & Fanning, TR 1996, 'Injuries in hiv-infected children compared to a general population of african-american children', Pediatric AIDS and HIV Infection, vol. 7, no. 5, pp. 375.
Turner BJ, Casey R, Cocroft James R, Christian C, Gbson E, Fanning TR. Injuries in hiv-infected children compared to a general population of african-american children. Pediatric AIDS and HIV Infection. 1996;7(5):375.
Turner, B. J. ; Casey, R. ; Cocroft James, R. ; Christian, C. ; Gbson, E. ; Fanning, T. R. / Injuries in hiv-infected children compared to a general population of african-american children. In: Pediatric AIDS and HIV Infection. 1996 ; Vol. 7, No. 5. pp. 375.
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abstract = "Objective: Because HIV+ children may be at increased risk of injury due to neurologic disease and their social environment we compared the rates of injuries for an HIV+ cohort in NYS to previously reported rates for African-American children from Philadelphia. Methode HIV+ children enrolled in NYS Medicaid and delivered by HIV+ women from 1985-90 were identified by a tested case finding method Clinicians specified ICD-9-CM codes for injuries and all unique injury events were identified from coded diagnoses from in- and out-patient claims for care of the HIV+ childreaWe calculated injury events per 100 child-years and compared these to reported rates for Philadelphia children (Schwarz DF et al. JAMA. 1994:271:755-60.} Results: 420 HIV+ children were studied, of whom 40.056 were African-American and 35.2{\%} were LatinaThe rates of injuries/100 child-yrs. in children <24 mos. were 217 for the HIV+ cohort compared to 21.3 for the general cohort The rate of bums was lower for the HIV+ cohort than the general group ( 1.58 vs. 2.09/100 child-yrs, respectively). However; the rate of poisoning was higher for the HIV+ cohort than the general group (173 vs. 1.73/100 child-yrs.). Poisoning from medications in the HIV+ cohort constituted one-third of all poisonings (0.86/100 child-yrs.). Six HIV+ children in this age group had a diagnosis of child maltreatment which is highly suspicious for child abuse. Six additional HIV+ children suffered three or more injuries in their first two years. Conclusions:The overall rate of injuries in our cohort of HIV+ children is similar to the rate reported for a general inner city p{\'e}diatrie population but poisonings may be more common in HIV+ children. Clinicians should counsel parents and caregivers of HIV+ children regarding the poisoning risk. As for all children, providers should be diligent in detecting any signs of abuse.",
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T1 - Injuries in hiv-infected children compared to a general population of african-american children

AU - Turner, B. J.

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AU - Gbson, E.

AU - Fanning, T. R.

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N2 - Objective: Because HIV+ children may be at increased risk of injury due to neurologic disease and their social environment we compared the rates of injuries for an HIV+ cohort in NYS to previously reported rates for African-American children from Philadelphia. Methode HIV+ children enrolled in NYS Medicaid and delivered by HIV+ women from 1985-90 were identified by a tested case finding method Clinicians specified ICD-9-CM codes for injuries and all unique injury events were identified from coded diagnoses from in- and out-patient claims for care of the HIV+ childreaWe calculated injury events per 100 child-years and compared these to reported rates for Philadelphia children (Schwarz DF et al. JAMA. 1994:271:755-60.} Results: 420 HIV+ children were studied, of whom 40.056 were African-American and 35.2% were LatinaThe rates of injuries/100 child-yrs. in children <24 mos. were 217 for the HIV+ cohort compared to 21.3 for the general cohort The rate of bums was lower for the HIV+ cohort than the general group ( 1.58 vs. 2.09/100 child-yrs, respectively). However; the rate of poisoning was higher for the HIV+ cohort than the general group (173 vs. 1.73/100 child-yrs.). Poisoning from medications in the HIV+ cohort constituted one-third of all poisonings (0.86/100 child-yrs.). Six HIV+ children in this age group had a diagnosis of child maltreatment which is highly suspicious for child abuse. Six additional HIV+ children suffered three or more injuries in their first two years. Conclusions:The overall rate of injuries in our cohort of HIV+ children is similar to the rate reported for a general inner city pédiatrie population but poisonings may be more common in HIV+ children. Clinicians should counsel parents and caregivers of HIV+ children regarding the poisoning risk. As for all children, providers should be diligent in detecting any signs of abuse.

AB - Objective: Because HIV+ children may be at increased risk of injury due to neurologic disease and their social environment we compared the rates of injuries for an HIV+ cohort in NYS to previously reported rates for African-American children from Philadelphia. Methode HIV+ children enrolled in NYS Medicaid and delivered by HIV+ women from 1985-90 were identified by a tested case finding method Clinicians specified ICD-9-CM codes for injuries and all unique injury events were identified from coded diagnoses from in- and out-patient claims for care of the HIV+ childreaWe calculated injury events per 100 child-years and compared these to reported rates for Philadelphia children (Schwarz DF et al. JAMA. 1994:271:755-60.} Results: 420 HIV+ children were studied, of whom 40.056 were African-American and 35.2% were LatinaThe rates of injuries/100 child-yrs. in children <24 mos. were 217 for the HIV+ cohort compared to 21.3 for the general cohort The rate of bums was lower for the HIV+ cohort than the general group ( 1.58 vs. 2.09/100 child-yrs, respectively). However; the rate of poisoning was higher for the HIV+ cohort than the general group (173 vs. 1.73/100 child-yrs.). Poisoning from medications in the HIV+ cohort constituted one-third of all poisonings (0.86/100 child-yrs.). Six HIV+ children in this age group had a diagnosis of child maltreatment which is highly suspicious for child abuse. Six additional HIV+ children suffered three or more injuries in their first two years. Conclusions:The overall rate of injuries in our cohort of HIV+ children is similar to the rate reported for a general inner city pédiatrie population but poisonings may be more common in HIV+ children. Clinicians should counsel parents and caregivers of HIV+ children regarding the poisoning risk. As for all children, providers should be diligent in detecting any signs of abuse.

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