Inhaled antibiotic therapy in chronic respiratory diseases

Diego J. Maselli, Holly Keyt, Marcos Restrepo

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The management of patients with chronic respiratory diseases affected by difficult to treat infections has become a challenge in clinical practice. Conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis require extensive treatment strategies to deal with multidrug resistant pathogens that include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia species and non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM). These challenges prompted scientists to deliver antimicrobial agents through the pulmonary system by using inhaled, aerosolized or nebulized antibiotics. Subsequent research advances focused on the development of antibiotic agents able to achieve high tissue concentrations capable of reducing the bacterial load of difficult-to-treat organisms in hosts with chronic respiratory conditions. In this review, we focus on the evidence regarding the use of antibiotic therapies administered through the respiratory system via inhalation, nebulization or aerosolization, specifically in patients with chronic respiratory diseases that include CF, non-CF bronchiectasis and NTM. However, further research is required to address the potential benefits, mechanisms of action and applications of inhaled antibiotics for the management of difficult-to-treat infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1062
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 16 2017

Fingerprint

respiratory diseases
Pulmonary diseases
antibiotics
Antibiotics
therapy
Chronic Disease
cystic fibrosis
Anti-Bacterial Agents
fibrosis
Bronchiectasis
infectious diseases
Mycobacterium
Cystic Fibrosis
Fibrosis
respiratory system
Burkholderia
Respiratory system
Antimicrobial agents
Methicillin
pseudomonas

Keywords

  • Aerosols
  • Bronchiectasis
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Nontuberculous mycobacteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Spectroscopy
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

Cite this

Inhaled antibiotic therapy in chronic respiratory diseases. / Maselli, Diego J.; Keyt, Holly; Restrepo, Marcos.

In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Vol. 18, No. 5, 1062, 16.05.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{d8c2c78d89b14701a7353aec7410d057,
title = "Inhaled antibiotic therapy in chronic respiratory diseases",
abstract = "The management of patients with chronic respiratory diseases affected by difficult to treat infections has become a challenge in clinical practice. Conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis require extensive treatment strategies to deal with multidrug resistant pathogens that include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia species and non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM). These challenges prompted scientists to deliver antimicrobial agents through the pulmonary system by using inhaled, aerosolized or nebulized antibiotics. Subsequent research advances focused on the development of antibiotic agents able to achieve high tissue concentrations capable of reducing the bacterial load of difficult-to-treat organisms in hosts with chronic respiratory conditions. In this review, we focus on the evidence regarding the use of antibiotic therapies administered through the respiratory system via inhalation, nebulization or aerosolization, specifically in patients with chronic respiratory diseases that include CF, non-CF bronchiectasis and NTM. However, further research is required to address the potential benefits, mechanisms of action and applications of inhaled antibiotics for the management of difficult-to-treat infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.",
keywords = "Aerosols, Bronchiectasis, Cystic fibrosis, Nontuberculous mycobacteria",
author = "Maselli, {Diego J.} and Holly Keyt and Marcos Restrepo",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "16",
doi = "10.3390/ijms18051062",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
journal = "International Journal of Molecular Sciences",
issn = "1661-6596",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inhaled antibiotic therapy in chronic respiratory diseases

AU - Maselli, Diego J.

AU - Keyt, Holly

AU - Restrepo, Marcos

PY - 2017/5/16

Y1 - 2017/5/16

N2 - The management of patients with chronic respiratory diseases affected by difficult to treat infections has become a challenge in clinical practice. Conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis require extensive treatment strategies to deal with multidrug resistant pathogens that include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia species and non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM). These challenges prompted scientists to deliver antimicrobial agents through the pulmonary system by using inhaled, aerosolized or nebulized antibiotics. Subsequent research advances focused on the development of antibiotic agents able to achieve high tissue concentrations capable of reducing the bacterial load of difficult-to-treat organisms in hosts with chronic respiratory conditions. In this review, we focus on the evidence regarding the use of antibiotic therapies administered through the respiratory system via inhalation, nebulization or aerosolization, specifically in patients with chronic respiratory diseases that include CF, non-CF bronchiectasis and NTM. However, further research is required to address the potential benefits, mechanisms of action and applications of inhaled antibiotics for the management of difficult-to-treat infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

AB - The management of patients with chronic respiratory diseases affected by difficult to treat infections has become a challenge in clinical practice. Conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis require extensive treatment strategies to deal with multidrug resistant pathogens that include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia species and non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM). These challenges prompted scientists to deliver antimicrobial agents through the pulmonary system by using inhaled, aerosolized or nebulized antibiotics. Subsequent research advances focused on the development of antibiotic agents able to achieve high tissue concentrations capable of reducing the bacterial load of difficult-to-treat organisms in hosts with chronic respiratory conditions. In this review, we focus on the evidence regarding the use of antibiotic therapies administered through the respiratory system via inhalation, nebulization or aerosolization, specifically in patients with chronic respiratory diseases that include CF, non-CF bronchiectasis and NTM. However, further research is required to address the potential benefits, mechanisms of action and applications of inhaled antibiotics for the management of difficult-to-treat infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

KW - Aerosols

KW - Bronchiectasis

KW - Cystic fibrosis

KW - Nontuberculous mycobacteria

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85019594586&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85019594586&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/ijms18051062

DO - 10.3390/ijms18051062

M3 - Review article

C2 - 28509852

AN - SCOPUS:85019594586

VL - 18

JO - International Journal of Molecular Sciences

JF - International Journal of Molecular Sciences

SN - 1661-6596

IS - 5

M1 - 1062

ER -