Infants at Risk for Schizophrenia: Sequelae of a Genetic Neurointegrative Defect: A Review and Replication Analysis of Pandysmaturation in the Jerusalem Infant Development Study

Barbara Fish, Joseph Marcus, Sydney L. Hans, Judith G. Auerbach, Sondra Perdue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

303 Scopus citations

Abstract

A 1975 report stated that a schizophrenic genotype may be manifested in infants by a neurointegrative defect called pandysmaturation. Recent evidence supports this: (1) 12 studies found delayed development in schizophrenics' infants and in preschizophrenics; (2) “blind” psychometric evaluations favored an adult schizotypal disorder in four to six of seven high-risk subjects with pandysmaturation in the New York study; and (3) finally, in a partial replication of this method using the Jerusalem data, blind diagnoses of “probable” and “possible” pandysmaturation were significantly related to a parental diagnosis of schizophrenia and to cognitive and motor neurointegrative deficits at 10 years. Obstetrical complications were unrelated to diagnosis, pandysmaturation, or outcome in the overall sample. However, we found a small subgroup of schizophrenic offspring in whom the most severe motor deficits at follow-up were related to obstetrical complications, pandysmaturation, and low birth weight.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-235
Number of pages15
JournalArchives of General Psychiatry
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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