Inaccurate estimation of body weight prior to smoking cessation: Implications for quitting and weight gain

Alan L. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Weight gain following smoking cessation has been found to hinder successful quitting. This preliminary investigation evaluated participants' ability to accurately estimate their body weight prior to attempting to quit smoking. The subjects were 51 adults (18 females and 33 males) with a mean age of 31 years. Subjects were asked to give their most accurate estimated weight in pounds just prior to obtaining their actual weight. The results indicated that subjects underestimated their weight by 3.5 lbs (1.59 kg). Two-thirds of the subjects underestimated their weight by an average of 6.6 lbs (2.99 kg). These findings suggest that obtaining an accurate body weight prior to smoking cessation may lead to a more accurate perception of subsequent weight change and facilitate successful quitting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-84
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Biobehavioral Research
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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