In Vivo Fluorescence Microendoscopic Monitoring of Stent-Induced Fibroblast Cell Proliferation in an Esophageal Mouse Model

Eun Jung Jun, Ho Young Song, Jung Hoon Park, Yoon Sung Bae, Bjorn Paulson, Sanghwa Lee, Young Chul Cho, Jiaywei Tsauo, Min Tae Kim, Kun Yung Kim, Su Geun Yang, Jun Ki Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) placement and fluorescence microendoscopic monitoring for determination of fibroblast cell proliferation after stent placement in an esophageal mouse model. Materials and Methods: Twenty fibroblast-specific protein (FSP)-1 green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice were analyzed. Ten mice (Group A) underwent SEMS placement, and fluoroscopic and fluorescence microendoscopic images were obtained biweekly until 8 weeks thereafter. Ten healthy mice (Group B) were used for control esophageal values. Results: SEMS placement was technically successful in all mice. The relative average number of fibroblast GFP cells and the intensities of GFP signals in Group A were significantly higher than in Group B after stent placement. The proliferative cellular response, including granulation tissue, epithelial layer, submucosal fibrosis, and connective tissue, was increased in Group A. FSP-1-positive cells were more prominent in Group A than in Group B. Conclusions: SEMS placement was feasible and safe in an esophageal mouse model, and proliferative cellular response caused by fibroblast cell proliferation after stent placement was longitudinally monitored using a noninvasive fluorescence microendoscopic technique. The results have implications for the understanding of proliferative cellular response after stent placement in real-life patients and provide initial insights into new clinical therapeutic strategies for restenosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1756-1763
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology
Volume29
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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