Implementing Cognitive Processing Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder With Active Duty U.S. Military Personnel

Special Considerations and Case Examples

Jennifer Schuster Wachen, Katherine A Dondanville, Kristi E. Pruiksma, Alma Molino, Cody S. Carson, Abby E. Blankenship, Charity Wilkinson, C. O L Jeffrey S Yarvis, Patricia A. Resick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Numerous studies and reports document the prevalence of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in military personnel returning from deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. The Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense recommend cognitive processing therapy (CPT) as one of two first-line treatment options for patients with PTSD. CPT is an evidence-based, trauma-focused cognitive treatment for PTSD that has been shown to be efficacious in a wide variety of populations, but has just begun to be implemented with active duty military. The purpose of this article is to describe treatment considerations that may be pertinent to active duty populations, including stigma related to mental health treatment and minimization of symptoms, duty obligations, and special factors related to rank and occupational specialties. We provide recommendations for navigating these issues within the CPT protocol. Additionally, we discuss common themes that may be especially relevant when conducting CPT with an active duty military population, including blame/responsibility, the military ethos, erroneous blame of others, just-world beliefs, traumatic loss, fear of harming others, and moral injury. Case examples illustrating the use of CPT to address these themes are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCognitive and Behavioral Practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 31 2014

Fingerprint

Military Personnel
Cognitive Therapy
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Population
Afghanistan
Iraq
Wounds and Injuries
Veterans
Therapeutics
Fear
Mental Health

Keywords

  • Active duty military
  • Cognitive processing therapy
  • Combat
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Implementing Cognitive Processing Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder With Active Duty U.S. Military Personnel : Special Considerations and Case Examples. / Wachen, Jennifer Schuster; Dondanville, Katherine A; Pruiksma, Kristi E.; Molino, Alma; Carson, Cody S.; Blankenship, Abby E.; Wilkinson, Charity; Yarvis, C. O L Jeffrey S; Resick, Patricia A.

In: Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 31.12.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wachen, Jennifer Schuster ; Dondanville, Katherine A ; Pruiksma, Kristi E. ; Molino, Alma ; Carson, Cody S. ; Blankenship, Abby E. ; Wilkinson, Charity ; Yarvis, C. O L Jeffrey S ; Resick, Patricia A. / Implementing Cognitive Processing Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder With Active Duty U.S. Military Personnel : Special Considerations and Case Examples. In: Cognitive and Behavioral Practice. 2014.
@article{5815d2f7dedd4ff498b762a7f50d3999,
title = "Implementing Cognitive Processing Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder With Active Duty U.S. Military Personnel: Special Considerations and Case Examples",
abstract = "Numerous studies and reports document the prevalence of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in military personnel returning from deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. The Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense recommend cognitive processing therapy (CPT) as one of two first-line treatment options for patients with PTSD. CPT is an evidence-based, trauma-focused cognitive treatment for PTSD that has been shown to be efficacious in a wide variety of populations, but has just begun to be implemented with active duty military. The purpose of this article is to describe treatment considerations that may be pertinent to active duty populations, including stigma related to mental health treatment and minimization of symptoms, duty obligations, and special factors related to rank and occupational specialties. We provide recommendations for navigating these issues within the CPT protocol. Additionally, we discuss common themes that may be especially relevant when conducting CPT with an active duty military population, including blame/responsibility, the military ethos, erroneous blame of others, just-world beliefs, traumatic loss, fear of harming others, and moral injury. Case examples illustrating the use of CPT to address these themes are provided.",
keywords = "Active duty military, Cognitive processing therapy, Combat, Posttraumatic stress disorder, Treatment",
author = "Wachen, {Jennifer Schuster} and Dondanville, {Katherine A} and Pruiksma, {Kristi E.} and Alma Molino and Carson, {Cody S.} and Blankenship, {Abby E.} and Charity Wilkinson and Yarvis, {C. O L Jeffrey S} and Resick, {Patricia A.}",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1016/j.cbpra.2015.08.007",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Cognitive and Behavioral Practice",
issn = "1077-7229",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Implementing Cognitive Processing Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder With Active Duty U.S. Military Personnel

T2 - Special Considerations and Case Examples

AU - Wachen, Jennifer Schuster

AU - Dondanville, Katherine A

AU - Pruiksma, Kristi E.

AU - Molino, Alma

AU - Carson, Cody S.

AU - Blankenship, Abby E.

AU - Wilkinson, Charity

AU - Yarvis, C. O L Jeffrey S

AU - Resick, Patricia A.

PY - 2014/12/31

Y1 - 2014/12/31

N2 - Numerous studies and reports document the prevalence of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in military personnel returning from deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. The Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense recommend cognitive processing therapy (CPT) as one of two first-line treatment options for patients with PTSD. CPT is an evidence-based, trauma-focused cognitive treatment for PTSD that has been shown to be efficacious in a wide variety of populations, but has just begun to be implemented with active duty military. The purpose of this article is to describe treatment considerations that may be pertinent to active duty populations, including stigma related to mental health treatment and minimization of symptoms, duty obligations, and special factors related to rank and occupational specialties. We provide recommendations for navigating these issues within the CPT protocol. Additionally, we discuss common themes that may be especially relevant when conducting CPT with an active duty military population, including blame/responsibility, the military ethos, erroneous blame of others, just-world beliefs, traumatic loss, fear of harming others, and moral injury. Case examples illustrating the use of CPT to address these themes are provided.

AB - Numerous studies and reports document the prevalence of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in military personnel returning from deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. The Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense recommend cognitive processing therapy (CPT) as one of two first-line treatment options for patients with PTSD. CPT is an evidence-based, trauma-focused cognitive treatment for PTSD that has been shown to be efficacious in a wide variety of populations, but has just begun to be implemented with active duty military. The purpose of this article is to describe treatment considerations that may be pertinent to active duty populations, including stigma related to mental health treatment and minimization of symptoms, duty obligations, and special factors related to rank and occupational specialties. We provide recommendations for navigating these issues within the CPT protocol. Additionally, we discuss common themes that may be especially relevant when conducting CPT with an active duty military population, including blame/responsibility, the military ethos, erroneous blame of others, just-world beliefs, traumatic loss, fear of harming others, and moral injury. Case examples illustrating the use of CPT to address these themes are provided.

KW - Active duty military

KW - Cognitive processing therapy

KW - Combat

KW - Posttraumatic stress disorder

KW - Treatment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84949966729&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84949966729&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cbpra.2015.08.007

DO - 10.1016/j.cbpra.2015.08.007

M3 - Article

JO - Cognitive and Behavioral Practice

JF - Cognitive and Behavioral Practice

SN - 1077-7229

ER -