Immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) as a biomarker for cystic fibrosis: Challenges in newborn dried blood spot screening

Bradford L. Therrell, W. Harry Hannon, Gary Hoffman, Jelili Ojodu, Philip M. Farrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

On May 23-24, 2011, a workshop entitled "Immunoreactive Trypsinogen (IRT) as a Biomarker for Cystic Fibrosis: Technical Issues and Challenges" was held in Annapolis, Maryland. The two-day workshop was co-hosted by the National Newborn Screening and Genetics Resource Center, Austin, Texas, and the Association of Public Health Laboratories, Silver Spring, Maryland, in collaboration with the Health Resources and Services Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Participants included nearly 40 representatives from U.S. state public health and commercial laboratories performing newborn dried blood spot screening tests for cystic fibrosis (CF), the federal government, academic research institutions, and commercial vendors of products used in newborn screening. Representatives from selected European CF newborn screening programs were also present. The workshop focused on identifying key IRT testing issues and mechanisms for achieving their resolution and laboratory harmonization in order to reduce, or eliminate completely, the late identified CF cases following a negative newborn screen. Informative findings are reported, their impacts on improving IRT screening are described, and their implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalMolecular Genetics and Metabolism
Volume106
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cystic fibrosis
  • False negatives
  • Immunoreactive trypsinogen
  • Newborn dried blood spot screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Endocrinology

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