IL-10 from dendritic cells but not from T regulatory cells protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity

Wei Wei Wang, Yamei Wang, Kang Li, Raghu Tadagavadi, William E. Friedrichs, Madhusudhan Budatha, W. Brian Reeves

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Interleukin-10 (IL-10), a cytokine with anti-inflammatory effects, is produced by renal parenchymal cells and bone marrow derived cells. Both endogenous and exogenous IL-10 are protective in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. However, the source of endogenous IL-10 in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is not clear. Bone marrow chimera experiments in IL10-KO mice indicated that bone marrow derived cells were the primary source of IL-10 in cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Cell specific deletion of IL-10 in T regulatory cells and dendritic cells was accomplished using Foxp3 and CD11c driven cre recombination in IL10flox/flox mice, respectively. Upon treatment with cisplatin, both the IL10flox/flox and the Foxp3YFP-Cre x IL10flox/flox mice developed similar degrees of kidney injury. However, mice with the dendritic cell deletion of IL-10 showed more severe structural and functional changes in the kidney compared to the IL10flox/flox mice. These results indicate that IL-10 from dendritic cells but not from T regulatory cells offers significant endogenous protection against cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0238816
JournalPloS one
Volume15
Issue number9 September
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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