Hypertension and acculturation in elderly Medican Americans: Results from 1982-84 Hispanic HANES

D. V. Espino, D. Maldonado

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Abstract

The purpose of our study was to describe the relationship between acculturation and hypertension in elderly Mexican Americans. Two age groups, 55-64 and 65-74, were examined from data provided in the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES). The prevalence of hypertension among subgroups of different acculturation was ascertained based on the modified Cuellar Acculturation Scale. Each age group was also stratified using the HHANES poverty index, with those above the index compared to those below. A stepwise logistic regression was performed among the variables of poverty, gender, age, and acculturation in relation to hypertension. The results indicate that acculturation and age are stronger predictors of hypertension than poverty in elderly Mexican Americans, with acculturation being a stronger predictor among those age 55-64. Factors related to acculturation may have a stronger influence on the prevalence of hypertension in older Mexican Americans than differences related to socioeconomic status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournals of Gerontology
Volume45
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1990

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Acculturation
Hispanic Americans
Hypertension
Poverty
Nutrition Surveys
Age Groups
Health
Social Class
Logistic Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging

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Hypertension and acculturation in elderly Medican Americans : Results from 1982-84 Hispanic HANES. / Espino, D. V.; Maldonado, D.

In: Journals of Gerontology, Vol. 45, No. 6, 1990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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