Hyperinsulinaemia during exercise does not suppress hepatic glycogen concentrations in patients with type 1 diabetes: A magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

K. Chokkalingam, K. Tsintzas, J. E.M. Snaar, L. Norton, B. Solanky, E. Leverton, P. Morris, P. Mansell, I. A. Macdonald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims/hypothesis: We compared in vivo changes in liver glycogen concentration during exercise between patients with type 1 diabetes and healthy volunteers. Methods: We studied seven men with type 1 diabetes (mean ± SEM diabetes duration 10 ± 2 years, age 33 ± 3 years, BMI 24 ± 1 kg/m2, HbA1c 8.1 ± 0.2% and VO 2 peak 43 ± 2 ml [kg lean body mass]-1 min -1) and five non-diabetic controls (mean ± SEM age 30 ± 3 years, BMI 22 ± 1 kg/m2, HbA1c 5.4 ± 0.1% and VO2 peak 52 ± 4 ml [kg lean body mass]-1 min-1, before and after a standardised breakfast and after three bouts (EX1, EX2, EX3) of 40 min of cycling at 60% VO2 peak. 13C Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver glycogen was acquired in a 3.0 T magnet using a surface coil. Whole-body substrate oxidation was determined using indirect calorimetry. Results: Blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the fasting state, during the postprandial period and during EX1 and EX2 in subjects with type 1 diabetes compared with controls. Serum insulin concentration was still different between groups during EX3 (p < 0.05), but blood glucose concentration was similar. There was no difference between groups in liver glycogen concentration before or after the three bouts of exercise, despite the relative hyperinsulinaemia in type 1 diabetes. There were also no differences in substrate oxidation rates between groups. Conclusions/interpretation: In patients with type 1 diabetes, hyperinsulinaemic and hyperglycaemic conditions during moderate exercise did not suppress hepatic glycogen concentrations. These findings do not support the hypothesis that exercise-induced hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes is due to suppression of hepatic glycogen mobilisation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1921-1929
Number of pages9
JournalDiabetologia
Volume50
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • Hyperinsulinaemia
  • Liver glycogen metabolism
  • Magnetic resonance spectroscopy
  • Type 1 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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    Chokkalingam, K., Tsintzas, K., Snaar, J. E. M., Norton, L., Solanky, B., Leverton, E., Morris, P., Mansell, P., & Macdonald, I. A. (2007). Hyperinsulinaemia during exercise does not suppress hepatic glycogen concentrations in patients with type 1 diabetes: A magnetic resonance spectroscopy study. Diabetologia, 50(9), 1921-1929. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-007-0747-4