Hyperglycemia increases the risk of death in extremely preterm baboons

Cynthia Blanco, Lisa L. McGill-Vargas, Donald C Mccurnin, Amy Quinn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:Transient neonatal hyperglycemia (HG) has been reported in up to 80% of extremely preterm human infants. We hypothesize that severe HG is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in preterm baboons.Methods:Sixty-six baboons born at 67% of gestation were studied. HG was defined as serum glucose level ≥150 mg/dl during the first week of life. Animals were stratified into two groups: severe HG (≥8 events) and nonsevere HG (<8 events).Results:HG developed in 65 of the 66 (98%) baboons that were included. A total of 3,386 glucose measurements were obtained. The mean serum glucose level was 159 ± 69 mg/dl for the severe HG group and 130 ± 48 mg/dl for the nonsevere HG group during the first week of life. No differences were found in gender, birth weight, sepsis, patent ductus arteriosus, or oxygenation/ventilation indexes between groups. Severe HG was associated with early death even after controlling for sepsis, postnatal steroid exposure, and catecholamine utilization.Conclusion:HG is common in preterm baboons and is not associated with short-term morbidity. Severe HG occurring in the first week of life is associated with early death in preterm baboons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-343
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Research
Volume73
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

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Papio
Hyperglycemia
Glucose
Sepsis
Extremely Premature Infants
Morbidity
Patent Ductus Arteriosus
Serum
Birth Weight
Catecholamines
Ventilation
Steroids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Hyperglycemia increases the risk of death in extremely preterm baboons. / Blanco, Cynthia; McGill-Vargas, Lisa L.; Mccurnin, Donald C; Quinn, Amy.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 73, No. 3, 03.2013, p. 337-343.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blanco, Cynthia ; McGill-Vargas, Lisa L. ; Mccurnin, Donald C ; Quinn, Amy. / Hyperglycemia increases the risk of death in extremely preterm baboons. In: Pediatric Research. 2013 ; Vol. 73, No. 3. pp. 337-343.
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