Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Awareness and Acceptability Among U.S.-Born and U.S. Foreign-Born Women Living in California

Jessica L. Barnack-Tavlaris, Luz M. Garcini, Caroline A. Macera, Stephanie Brodine, Elizabeth A. Klonoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined human papillomavirus vaccine awareness and acceptance between U.S.-born and U.S. foreign-born women by utilizing California Health Interview Survey data from 1,672 women (ages 18–27) and 2,994 mothers (ages 28–65). Foreign-born women and mothers had lower vaccine awareness. Foreign-born young adult Latinas had greater vaccine acceptance than U.S.-born Latinas. Other factors associated with young adult women's vaccine acceptability were being younger, unmarried, and sexually active in the past year; having poorer self-reported health; and having heard of the vaccine. Variables associated with mothers’ vaccine acceptability were being White, insured, and unmarried; having had a Pap test in past 3 years; being less educated; and being impoverished.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)444-462
Number of pages19
JournalHealth Care for Women International
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions(all)

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