Human immunodeficiency virus-2 infection in baboons is an animal model for human immunodeficiency virus pathogenesis in humans

Christopher P. Locher, Susan W. Barnett, Brian G. Herndier, David J. Blackbourn, G. Reyes-Terán, Krishna K. Murthy, Kathleen M. Brasky, Gene B. Hubbard, Todd A. Reinhart, Ashley T. Haase, Jay A. Levy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective. - To assess disease progression in baboons (Papio cynocephalus) that were infected with two human immunodeficiency virus-2 (HIV-2) isolates. Methods. - Eight baboons were inoculated intravenously with either HIV-2(UC2) or HIV-2(UC14) and were followed for a 2- to 7-year period of observation. Results. - Six of 8 baboons showed lymphadenopathy and other signs of HIV-related disease, 3 of 8 baboons had an acute phase CD4+ T-cell decline, and 2 of 5 baboons infected with the HIV-2(UC2) isolate progressed to an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-like disease. Human immunodeficiency virus-2-specific pathology in lymphatic tissues included follicular lysis, vascular proliferation, and lymphoid depletion. Both neutralizing antibodies and a CD8+ T-cell antiviral response were associated with resistance to disease. Conclusions. - Disease progression and the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in HIV-2-infected baboons have similarities to human HIV infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)523-533
Number of pages11
JournalArchives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Volume122
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1998
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Medical Laboratory Technology

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