HUMAN d‐AMPHETAMINE DRUG DISCRIMINATION: METHAMPHETAMINE AND HYDROMORPHONE

R. J. Lamb, J. E. Henningfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

Standard measures of subjective and discriminative effects of drugs were compared in 5 human volunteers. Subjects responded on a second‐order color‐tracking procedure, where 30 mg of d‐amphetamine served as a discriminative stimulus for one response and its absence as the discriminative stimulus for another response. Self‐reported subjective effects were assessed concurrently using the single‐dose questionnaire, subscales of the Addiction Research Center Inventory, and several analogue rating scales. On different days following discrimination acquisition, varying doses of d‐amphetamine, methamphetamine, and hydromorphone were administered. In these test sessions, either response was reinforced. Methamphetamine and d‐amphetamine occasioned dose‐related increases in d‐amphetamine appropriate responding; hydromorphone did not. Methamphetamine and d‐amphetamine occasioned dose‐related increases in reports of the drug received being most like “speed”; hydromorphone occasioned dose‐related increases in reports of the drug received being most like “dope.” All three drugs occasioned dose‐related increases in reports of drug liking, and increases in the morphine‐benzedrine group, amphetamine, and benzedrine group scales of the Addiction Research Center Inventory. This experiment demonstrated that although explicit discriminative control of behavior by a drug may covary with drug identification, it does not necessarily covary with other self‐reported subjective effects. Thus, the complementary nature of the data provided by drug discrimination and standard subjective‐effects measures provides quantitative and qualitative data useful in studying both relatively novel compounds and the behavioral biology of psychoactive drugs in general. 1994 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-180
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the experimental analysis of behavior
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1994

Keywords

  • drug discrimination
  • d‐amphetamine
  • humans
  • hydromorphone
  • lever pull
  • methamphetamine
  • rating scales
  • subjective reports

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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