How do attitudes toward mental health treatment vary by age, gender, and ethnicity/race in young adults?

Jodi M. Gonzalez, Morgariro Alegrid, Thomas J. Prihoda

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

110 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article investigates attitudes toward seeking mental health treatment in a national epidemiological sample. Young adults reported the most negative attitudes, as compared to older adults. Males reported more negative attitudes, as compared to females, a consistent finding in young adults. The gender difference was not consistent in Latinos and African Americans. Although African Americans reported more positive attitudes than Anglos, this effect was not observed in young adults. Latinos reported similar attitudes toward mental health treatment, as compared to Anglos, a consistent finding in young adults. Results show that attitudes toward mental health treatment in young adult males are the most negative of all groups. Latinos and African Americans do not necessarily demonstrate more negative attitudes toward mental health treatment than Anglos. Within-group differences in ethnic/racial minority groups may not be similar to differences seen in Anglo populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)611-629
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Community Psychology
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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