Hodgkin's disease with lymphocyte predominance: Long-term results based on current histopathologic criteria

Chul S. Ha, Vivek Kavadi, Meletios A. Dimopoulos, Frederick B. Hagemeister, Barbara M. Osborne, Lillian M. Fuller, Terry L. Smith, Mark A. Hess, Peter W. McLaughlin, Fernando F. Cabanillas, James D. Cox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To define the disease course, therapeutic strategies, patterns and rates of relapse and causes of death for patients with Hodgkin's disease with lymphocyte predominance (LPHD) and to assess prognostic factors including nodular and diffuse histologic patterns. Patients and Methods: The records of all previously untreated patients with LPHD who received initial treatment at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (UTMDACC) from 1960 through 1992 were reviewed. Clinical and histopathologic characteristics, specifically nodular and diffuse LPHI), and treatment groups were assessed by overall and relapse-free survival, patterns of relapse, and causes of death. Results: Of 70 patients, 58 (83%) had nodular LPHD and 12 (17%) had a diffuse pattern: clinical characteristics were similar between the two subtypes. The median age of all patients was 25 years, 79% were male, 96% presented with stage I or II disease and 93% were free of B symptoms. Laparotomy (23 patients) failed to upstage any patient with a negative lymphogram. With a median follow-up of 12.3 years for alive patients, 19 (27%) patients have relapsed. All 3 relapses among the patients with diffuse subtype occurred within 3 years while 9 of 16 relapses occurred after 5 years with nodular subtype. However, we did not detect any statistically significant difference in relapse free survival or survival between the subtypes in our patient population. There was some suggestion that patients aged 40 and older experienced shorter survival; no other pretreatment characteristics were noted to be associated with relapse free survival or survival. Though there were no relapses within the radiation fields, no effect of extent of radiation therapy on relapse rate was observed. Thirteen (19%) patients have died, 6 (8.6%) of whom succumbed to LPHD. Two patients developed diffuse large cell lymphoma. Conclusions: Patients with LPHD usually present with localized and asymptomatic disease. Laparotomy is unnecessary if the lymphogram is negative. Nodular histology occurred in the majority of patients. Though all relapses from diffuse subtype occurred within 3 years in contrast to some late relapses observed for nodular subtype, there was no statistically significant difference in relapse free survival or survival between the subtypes. The extent of irradiation had no effect on relapse free survival or survival. We could not find any evidence that LPHD should be treated any different from the classical Hodgkin's disease at this point despite suggestions that it be classified as a non- Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-334
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 1999

Keywords

  • Hodgkin's disease
  • Long-term results
  • Lymphocyte predominance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiation
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cancer Research

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