History of treated periodontitis and smoking as risks for implant therapy

Lisa J.A. Heitz-Mayfield, Guy Huynh-Ba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

162 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this review was to evaluate a history of treated periodontitis and smoking, both alone and combined, as risk factors for adverse dental implant outcomes. Materials and Methods: A literature search of MEDLINE (Ovid) and EMBASE from January 1, 1966, to June 30, 2008, was performed, and the outcome variables implant survival, implant success, occurrence of peri-implantitis and marginal bone loss were evaluated. Results: Considerable heterogeneity in study design was found, and few studies accounted for confounding variables. For patients with a history of treated periodontitis, the majority of studies reported implant survival rates > 90%. Three cohort studies showed a higher risk of peri-implantitis in patients with a history of treated periodontitis compared with those without a history of periodontitis (reported odds ratios from 3.1 to 4.7). In three of four systematic reviews, smoking was found to be a significant risk for adverse implant outcome. While the majority of studies reported implant survival rates ranging from 80% to 96% in smokers, most studies found statistically significantly lower survival rates than for nonsmokers. Conclusions: There is an increased risk of periimplantitis in smokers compared with nonsmokers (reported odds ratios from 3.6 to 4.6). The combination of a history of treated periodontitis and smoking increases the risk of implant failure and peri-implant bone loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-68
Number of pages30
JournalInternational Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants
Volume24
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Keywords

  • Implant success
  • Implant survival
  • Peri-implantitis
  • Periodontitis
  • Smoking
  • Tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery

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