Higher Dietary Inflammatory Index scores are associated with brain MRI markers of brain aging: Results from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring cohort*

Debora Melo Van Lent, Hannah Gokingco, Meghan I. Short, Changzheng Yuan, Paul F. Jacques, José R. Romero, Charles S. DeCarli, Alexa S. Beiser, Sudha Seshadri, Jayandra J. Himali, Mini E. Jacob

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: We investigated cross-sectional associations between the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) and measures of brain volume and cerebral small vessel disease among participants of the Framingham Heart Study Offspring cohort. Methods: A total of 1897 participants (mean ± standard deviation, age 62±9) completed Food Frequency Questionnaires and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: Higher (pro-inflammatory) DII scores, averaged across a maximum of three time points, were associated with smaller total brain volume (beta ± standard error: –0.16 ± 0.03; P <.0001) after adjustment for demographic, clinical, and lifestyle covariates. In addition, higher DII scores were associated with smaller total gray matter volume (–0.08 ± 0.03; P =.003) and larger lateral ventricular volume (0.04 ± 0.02; P =.03). No associations were observed with other brain MRI measures. Discussion: Our findings showed associations between higher DII scores and global brain MRI measures. As we are one of the first groups to report on the associations between higher DII scores and brain volume, replication is needed to confirm our findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)621-631
Number of pages11
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2023

Keywords

  • Framingham Heart Study
  • apolipoprotein E ε4
  • brain volume
  • cerebral microbleeds
  • inflammatory diet
  • silent brain infarcts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Health Policy
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Epidemiology

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