High school students in a health career promotion program report fewer acts of aggression and violence

Manuel Ángel Oscós-Sánchez, Janna Lesser, L. Dolores Oscós-Flores

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: This study examined the effects of two school-based programs on the perpetration of nonphysical aggression, physical violence, and intimate partner violence among high-risk secondary school students in an economically disadvantaged and predominantly Latino school district. The intervention program was El Joven Noble, and the control program was the Teen Medical Academy. Methods: The study used a repeated-measures quasi-experimental intervention/control design. The participants self-reported the previous 30 days' acts of nonphysical aggression, physical violence, and intimate partner violence at baseline and at 3 and 9 months after enrollment. Program- and grade-level effects at 3 and 9 months were examined using three-factor analyses of covariance models with one factor for repeated measures. The covariate in each of the models was the baseline measure of the dependent outcomes. Results: No significant baseline differences were found between the participants in the intervention (n = 96) and control (n = 127) programs. At 9 months after enrollment in the study, high school students who participated in the Teen Medical Academy reported fewer acts of nonphysical aggression (p <.001) and physical violence (p =.002) than high school students who participated in El Joven Noble. Students who participated in the Teen Medical Academy also reported fewer acts of intimate partner violence (p =.02) than students who participated in El Joven Noble. Conclusions: High school students who participated in a health career promotion program reported fewer acts of aggression and violence as compared with high school students who participated in a culturally tailored character development program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-101
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Latino
  • Prevention
  • Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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