Heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass in American Indians

The Strong Heart Study

Jonathan N. Bella, Jean W. MacCluer, Mary J. Roman, Laura Almasy, Kari E. North, Lyle G. Best, Elisa T. Lee, Richard R. Fabsitz, Barbara V. Howard, Richard B. Devereux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We sought to determine the heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass in adult American Indians. Methods: Echocardiograms were analysed in 1373 American Indian participants, from 445 families, in the Strong Heart Study (SHS) to determine the heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass. Heritability calculations were performed using variance component analysis in SOLAR, a computer analysis program. Results: The SHS participants analysed in this study included 1305 relative pairs, predominantly (n = 1077) sibpairs. After simultaneously adjusting for sex, age and centre, the proportion of the residual phenotypic variance due to additive genetic effects or heritability (h2) of left ventricular mass was 0.27 (SE = 0.08, P < 0.001). Addition of body weight, height, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes into the polygenic model attenuated the residual h2 of left ventricular mass to 0.17 (SE = 0.09, P < 0.05). The residual h2 for left ventricular end-diastollc chamber diameter (LVID), after simultaneously adjusting for sex, age and centre was 0.36 (SE = 0.08, P < 0.001) for the analysed families. The residual h2 for interventricular septal wall thickness was 0.26 (SE = 0.07), while that of left ventricular posterior wall thickness was 0.19 (SE = 0.08, both P < 0.001). While adjustment for body weight, height, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes reduced the h2 of LVID to 0.33 (SE = 0.09, P < 0.001), the h2 of septal (0.12, SE = 0.10) and posterior wall thickness (0.09, SE = 0.09) were no longer significant after similar adjustment. The residual h2 for relative wall thickness, a measure of left ventricular geometry, was 0.22 (SE = 0.07, P < 0.001) after adjusting for sex, age and centre, and 0.17 (SE = 0.08, P < 0.05) after additional adjustment for body weight, height, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes. Conclusions: A substantial proportion of the variance of left ventricular dimensions and mass can be explained by heredity, independent of the effects of sex, age, body size, blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes. Identification of genes influencing left ventricular size and geometry may provide mechanistic and therapeutic targets to prevent left ventricular hypertrophy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-286
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Hypertension
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

North American Indians
Blood Pressure
Body Height
Heart Rate
Body Weight
Social Adjustment
Heredity
Body Size
Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
Analysis of Variance
Software
Genes

Keywords

  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Echocardiography
  • Epidemiology
  • Genetics
  • Hypertension
  • Left ventricular mass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Bella, J. N., MacCluer, J. W., Roman, M. J., Almasy, L., North, K. E., Best, L. G., ... Devereux, R. B. (2004). Heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass in American Indians: The Strong Heart Study. Journal of Hypertension, 22(2), 281-286. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004872-200402000-00011

Heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass in American Indians : The Strong Heart Study. / Bella, Jonathan N.; MacCluer, Jean W.; Roman, Mary J.; Almasy, Laura; North, Kari E.; Best, Lyle G.; Lee, Elisa T.; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Howard, Barbara V.; Devereux, Richard B.

In: Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 22, No. 2, 02.2004, p. 281-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bella, JN, MacCluer, JW, Roman, MJ, Almasy, L, North, KE, Best, LG, Lee, ET, Fabsitz, RR, Howard, BV & Devereux, RB 2004, 'Heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass in American Indians: The Strong Heart Study', Journal of Hypertension, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 281-286. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004872-200402000-00011
Bella, Jonathan N. ; MacCluer, Jean W. ; Roman, Mary J. ; Almasy, Laura ; North, Kari E. ; Best, Lyle G. ; Lee, Elisa T. ; Fabsitz, Richard R. ; Howard, Barbara V. ; Devereux, Richard B. / Heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass in American Indians : The Strong Heart Study. In: Journal of Hypertension. 2004 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 281-286.
@article{5a22699907c94d7ca27848eb26e6eb23,
title = "Heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass in American Indians: The Strong Heart Study",
abstract = "Objective: We sought to determine the heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass in adult American Indians. Methods: Echocardiograms were analysed in 1373 American Indian participants, from 445 families, in the Strong Heart Study (SHS) to determine the heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass. Heritability calculations were performed using variance component analysis in SOLAR, a computer analysis program. Results: The SHS participants analysed in this study included 1305 relative pairs, predominantly (n = 1077) sibpairs. After simultaneously adjusting for sex, age and centre, the proportion of the residual phenotypic variance due to additive genetic effects or heritability (h2) of left ventricular mass was 0.27 (SE = 0.08, P < 0.001). Addition of body weight, height, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes into the polygenic model attenuated the residual h2 of left ventricular mass to 0.17 (SE = 0.09, P < 0.05). The residual h2 for left ventricular end-diastollc chamber diameter (LVID), after simultaneously adjusting for sex, age and centre was 0.36 (SE = 0.08, P < 0.001) for the analysed families. The residual h2 for interventricular septal wall thickness was 0.26 (SE = 0.07), while that of left ventricular posterior wall thickness was 0.19 (SE = 0.08, both P < 0.001). While adjustment for body weight, height, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes reduced the h2 of LVID to 0.33 (SE = 0.09, P < 0.001), the h2 of septal (0.12, SE = 0.10) and posterior wall thickness (0.09, SE = 0.09) were no longer significant after similar adjustment. The residual h2 for relative wall thickness, a measure of left ventricular geometry, was 0.22 (SE = 0.07, P < 0.001) after adjusting for sex, age and centre, and 0.17 (SE = 0.08, P < 0.05) after additional adjustment for body weight, height, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes. Conclusions: A substantial proportion of the variance of left ventricular dimensions and mass can be explained by heredity, independent of the effects of sex, age, body size, blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes. Identification of genes influencing left ventricular size and geometry may provide mechanistic and therapeutic targets to prevent left ventricular hypertrophy.",
keywords = "Diabetes mellitus, Echocardiography, Epidemiology, Genetics, Hypertension, Left ventricular mass",
author = "Bella, {Jonathan N.} and MacCluer, {Jean W.} and Roman, {Mary J.} and Laura Almasy and North, {Kari E.} and Best, {Lyle G.} and Lee, {Elisa T.} and Fabsitz, {Richard R.} and Howard, {Barbara V.} and Devereux, {Richard B.}",
year = "2004",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1097/00004872-200402000-00011",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "281--286",
journal = "Journal of Hypertension",
issn = "0263-6352",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass in American Indians

T2 - The Strong Heart Study

AU - Bella, Jonathan N.

AU - MacCluer, Jean W.

AU - Roman, Mary J.

AU - Almasy, Laura

AU - North, Kari E.

AU - Best, Lyle G.

AU - Lee, Elisa T.

AU - Fabsitz, Richard R.

AU - Howard, Barbara V.

AU - Devereux, Richard B.

PY - 2004/2

Y1 - 2004/2

N2 - Objective: We sought to determine the heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass in adult American Indians. Methods: Echocardiograms were analysed in 1373 American Indian participants, from 445 families, in the Strong Heart Study (SHS) to determine the heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass. Heritability calculations were performed using variance component analysis in SOLAR, a computer analysis program. Results: The SHS participants analysed in this study included 1305 relative pairs, predominantly (n = 1077) sibpairs. After simultaneously adjusting for sex, age and centre, the proportion of the residual phenotypic variance due to additive genetic effects or heritability (h2) of left ventricular mass was 0.27 (SE = 0.08, P < 0.001). Addition of body weight, height, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes into the polygenic model attenuated the residual h2 of left ventricular mass to 0.17 (SE = 0.09, P < 0.05). The residual h2 for left ventricular end-diastollc chamber diameter (LVID), after simultaneously adjusting for sex, age and centre was 0.36 (SE = 0.08, P < 0.001) for the analysed families. The residual h2 for interventricular septal wall thickness was 0.26 (SE = 0.07), while that of left ventricular posterior wall thickness was 0.19 (SE = 0.08, both P < 0.001). While adjustment for body weight, height, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes reduced the h2 of LVID to 0.33 (SE = 0.09, P < 0.001), the h2 of septal (0.12, SE = 0.10) and posterior wall thickness (0.09, SE = 0.09) were no longer significant after similar adjustment. The residual h2 for relative wall thickness, a measure of left ventricular geometry, was 0.22 (SE = 0.07, P < 0.001) after adjusting for sex, age and centre, and 0.17 (SE = 0.08, P < 0.05) after additional adjustment for body weight, height, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes. Conclusions: A substantial proportion of the variance of left ventricular dimensions and mass can be explained by heredity, independent of the effects of sex, age, body size, blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes. Identification of genes influencing left ventricular size and geometry may provide mechanistic and therapeutic targets to prevent left ventricular hypertrophy.

AB - Objective: We sought to determine the heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass in adult American Indians. Methods: Echocardiograms were analysed in 1373 American Indian participants, from 445 families, in the Strong Heart Study (SHS) to determine the heritability of left ventricular dimensions and mass. Heritability calculations were performed using variance component analysis in SOLAR, a computer analysis program. Results: The SHS participants analysed in this study included 1305 relative pairs, predominantly (n = 1077) sibpairs. After simultaneously adjusting for sex, age and centre, the proportion of the residual phenotypic variance due to additive genetic effects or heritability (h2) of left ventricular mass was 0.27 (SE = 0.08, P < 0.001). Addition of body weight, height, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes into the polygenic model attenuated the residual h2 of left ventricular mass to 0.17 (SE = 0.09, P < 0.05). The residual h2 for left ventricular end-diastollc chamber diameter (LVID), after simultaneously adjusting for sex, age and centre was 0.36 (SE = 0.08, P < 0.001) for the analysed families. The residual h2 for interventricular septal wall thickness was 0.26 (SE = 0.07), while that of left ventricular posterior wall thickness was 0.19 (SE = 0.08, both P < 0.001). While adjustment for body weight, height, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes reduced the h2 of LVID to 0.33 (SE = 0.09, P < 0.001), the h2 of septal (0.12, SE = 0.10) and posterior wall thickness (0.09, SE = 0.09) were no longer significant after similar adjustment. The residual h2 for relative wall thickness, a measure of left ventricular geometry, was 0.22 (SE = 0.07, P < 0.001) after adjusting for sex, age and centre, and 0.17 (SE = 0.08, P < 0.05) after additional adjustment for body weight, height, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes. Conclusions: A substantial proportion of the variance of left ventricular dimensions and mass can be explained by heredity, independent of the effects of sex, age, body size, blood pressure, heart rate, medications and diabetes. Identification of genes influencing left ventricular size and geometry may provide mechanistic and therapeutic targets to prevent left ventricular hypertrophy.

KW - Diabetes mellitus

KW - Echocardiography

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Genetics

KW - Hypertension

KW - Left ventricular mass

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=10744228677&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=10744228677&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00004872-200402000-00011

DO - 10.1097/00004872-200402000-00011

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 281

EP - 286

JO - Journal of Hypertension

JF - Journal of Hypertension

SN - 0263-6352

IS - 2

ER -