Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) preserves gut barrier function by blocking neutrophil-endothelial cell adhesion after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in mice

Hong Yi Zhang, Iyore James, Chun-liang Chen, Gail E. Besner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We have shown that heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) protects the intestines from injury in several different animal models, including hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (HS/R). The current study was designed to explore the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory role of HB-EGF in preservation of gut barrier function after injury. Methods: In vivo, HS/R was induced in wild-type and neutropenic mice, with or without administration of HB-EGF, and intestinal permeability determined by use of the everted gut sac method. In vitro, cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNs) were used to determine the effects of HB-EGF on HUVEC-PMN adhesion, reactive oxygen species production in PMN, adhesion molecule expression in HUVEC and PMN, and the signaling pathways involved. Results: We found that administration of HB-EGF to healthy mice led to preservation of gut barrier function after HS/R. Likewise, induction of neutropenia in mice also led to preservation of gut barrier function after HS/R. Administration of HB-EGF to neutropenic mice did not lead to further improvement in gut barrier function. In vitro studies showed that HB-EGF decreased neutrophil-endothelial cell (PMN-EC) adherence by down-regulating adhesion molecule expression in EC via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt pathway, and by inhibiting adhesion molecule surface mobilization and reactive oxygen species production in PMN. Conclusion: These results indicate that HB-EGF preserves gut barrier function by inhibiting PMN and EC activation, thereby blocking PMN-EC adherence after HS/R in mice, and support the future use of HB-EGF in disease states manifested by hypoperfusion injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)594-605
Number of pages12
JournalSurgery
Volume151
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hemorrhagic Shock
Epidermal Growth Factor
Cell Adhesion
Resuscitation
Heparin
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Neutrophils
Endothelial Cells
Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells
Reactive Oxygen Species
Wounds and Injuries
1-Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase
Neutropenia
Intestines
Permeability
Blood Cells
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Animal Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) preserves gut barrier function by blocking neutrophil-endothelial cell adhesion after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in mice. / Zhang, Hong Yi; James, Iyore; Chen, Chun-liang; Besner, Gail E.

In: Surgery, Vol. 151, No. 4, 04.2012, p. 594-605.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5aecd9e5b5fe4e8ba3b3f30469e70424,
title = "Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) preserves gut barrier function by blocking neutrophil-endothelial cell adhesion after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in mice",
abstract = "Background: We have shown that heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) protects the intestines from injury in several different animal models, including hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (HS/R). The current study was designed to explore the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory role of HB-EGF in preservation of gut barrier function after injury. Methods: In vivo, HS/R was induced in wild-type and neutropenic mice, with or without administration of HB-EGF, and intestinal permeability determined by use of the everted gut sac method. In vitro, cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNs) were used to determine the effects of HB-EGF on HUVEC-PMN adhesion, reactive oxygen species production in PMN, adhesion molecule expression in HUVEC and PMN, and the signaling pathways involved. Results: We found that administration of HB-EGF to healthy mice led to preservation of gut barrier function after HS/R. Likewise, induction of neutropenia in mice also led to preservation of gut barrier function after HS/R. Administration of HB-EGF to neutropenic mice did not lead to further improvement in gut barrier function. In vitro studies showed that HB-EGF decreased neutrophil-endothelial cell (PMN-EC) adherence by down-regulating adhesion molecule expression in EC via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt pathway, and by inhibiting adhesion molecule surface mobilization and reactive oxygen species production in PMN. Conclusion: These results indicate that HB-EGF preserves gut barrier function by inhibiting PMN and EC activation, thereby blocking PMN-EC adherence after HS/R in mice, and support the future use of HB-EGF in disease states manifested by hypoperfusion injury.",
author = "Zhang, {Hong Yi} and Iyore James and Chun-liang Chen and Besner, {Gail E.}",
year = "2012",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1016/j.surg.2011.10.001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "151",
pages = "594--605",
journal = "Surgery (United States)",
issn = "0039-6060",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) preserves gut barrier function by blocking neutrophil-endothelial cell adhesion after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in mice

AU - Zhang, Hong Yi

AU - James, Iyore

AU - Chen, Chun-liang

AU - Besner, Gail E.

PY - 2012/4

Y1 - 2012/4

N2 - Background: We have shown that heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) protects the intestines from injury in several different animal models, including hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (HS/R). The current study was designed to explore the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory role of HB-EGF in preservation of gut barrier function after injury. Methods: In vivo, HS/R was induced in wild-type and neutropenic mice, with or without administration of HB-EGF, and intestinal permeability determined by use of the everted gut sac method. In vitro, cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNs) were used to determine the effects of HB-EGF on HUVEC-PMN adhesion, reactive oxygen species production in PMN, adhesion molecule expression in HUVEC and PMN, and the signaling pathways involved. Results: We found that administration of HB-EGF to healthy mice led to preservation of gut barrier function after HS/R. Likewise, induction of neutropenia in mice also led to preservation of gut barrier function after HS/R. Administration of HB-EGF to neutropenic mice did not lead to further improvement in gut barrier function. In vitro studies showed that HB-EGF decreased neutrophil-endothelial cell (PMN-EC) adherence by down-regulating adhesion molecule expression in EC via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt pathway, and by inhibiting adhesion molecule surface mobilization and reactive oxygen species production in PMN. Conclusion: These results indicate that HB-EGF preserves gut barrier function by inhibiting PMN and EC activation, thereby blocking PMN-EC adherence after HS/R in mice, and support the future use of HB-EGF in disease states manifested by hypoperfusion injury.

AB - Background: We have shown that heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) protects the intestines from injury in several different animal models, including hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (HS/R). The current study was designed to explore the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory role of HB-EGF in preservation of gut barrier function after injury. Methods: In vivo, HS/R was induced in wild-type and neutropenic mice, with or without administration of HB-EGF, and intestinal permeability determined by use of the everted gut sac method. In vitro, cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNs) were used to determine the effects of HB-EGF on HUVEC-PMN adhesion, reactive oxygen species production in PMN, adhesion molecule expression in HUVEC and PMN, and the signaling pathways involved. Results: We found that administration of HB-EGF to healthy mice led to preservation of gut barrier function after HS/R. Likewise, induction of neutropenia in mice also led to preservation of gut barrier function after HS/R. Administration of HB-EGF to neutropenic mice did not lead to further improvement in gut barrier function. In vitro studies showed that HB-EGF decreased neutrophil-endothelial cell (PMN-EC) adherence by down-regulating adhesion molecule expression in EC via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt pathway, and by inhibiting adhesion molecule surface mobilization and reactive oxygen species production in PMN. Conclusion: These results indicate that HB-EGF preserves gut barrier function by inhibiting PMN and EC activation, thereby blocking PMN-EC adherence after HS/R in mice, and support the future use of HB-EGF in disease states manifested by hypoperfusion injury.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84858438663&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84858438663&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.surg.2011.10.001

DO - 10.1016/j.surg.2011.10.001

M3 - Article

C2 - 22153812

AN - SCOPUS:84858438663

VL - 151

SP - 594

EP - 605

JO - Surgery (United States)

JF - Surgery (United States)

SN - 0039-6060

IS - 4

ER -