Glycopyrrolate as a substitute for atropine in neostigmine reversal of muscle relaxant drugs

S. Ramamurthy, M. H. Shaker, A. P. Winnie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A controlled study was undertaken in man to evaluate glycopyrrolate as a substitute for atropine in anaesthesia by determining the relative ability of the two drugs to protect against the cholinergic challenge provided by neostigmine administered at the conclusion of anaesthesia for reversal of neuromuscular blockade. Results indicate that glycopyrrolate offers the same protection against neostigmine-induced bradycardia as atropine with a marked reduction in the magnitude of the initial tachycardia. The dose of glycopyrrolate required to do this is 0.2 mg for each 1 mg of neostigmine administered, which is half the dose of atropine required for the same purpose.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-411
Number of pages13
JournalCanadian Anaesthetists' Society Journal
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1972
Externally publishedYes

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Glycopyrrolate
Neostigmine
Atropine
Muscles
Anesthesia
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Neuromuscular Blockade
Bradycardia
Tachycardia
Cholinergic Agents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Glycopyrrolate as a substitute for atropine in neostigmine reversal of muscle relaxant drugs. / Ramamurthy, S.; Shaker, M. H.; Winnie, A. P.

In: Canadian Anaesthetists' Society Journal, Vol. 19, No. 4, 07.1972, p. 399-411.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ramamurthy, S. ; Shaker, M. H. ; Winnie, A. P. / Glycopyrrolate as a substitute for atropine in neostigmine reversal of muscle relaxant drugs. In: Canadian Anaesthetists' Society Journal. 1972 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 399-411.
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