Glucose control and cardiovascular outcomes in clinical trials of sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor treatments in type 2 diabetes

Rene A Oliveros, Son V. Pham, Steven R Bailey, Robert J Chilton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Currently available medications for the treatment of type 2 diabetes have limitations, and many patients do not achieve glycaemic control. Recently, a new approach has emerged using sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors that decrease glucose reabsorption in the kidneys, increasing urinary glucose excretion. These agents offer the potential to improve glycaemic control independently of insulin pathways while avoiding hypoglycaemia. Two drugs of this class, canagliflozin and dapagliflozin, have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA); another, empagliflozin, has been filed for regulatory approval and several others are in advanced development. These drugs have been shown to effectively reduce blood glucose, fasting plasma glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1C) levels in phase III clinical trials when used as monotherapy and as add-on therapy to other diabetes medications, including insulin. Another advantage of the SGLT2 inhibitors over existing treatments is the improvement in cardiovascular risk factors, particularly in terms of reductions in blood pressure and body weight. SGLT2 inhibitors have been generally well tolerated. While more long-term safety data are required to elucidate the benefit-risk profile of SGLT2 inhibitors, the rationale for their use in type 2 diabetes therapy is strong.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-123
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Endocrinology
Volume10
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2
Symporters
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Clinical Trials
Glucose
Insulin
Phase III Clinical Trials
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
United States Food and Drug Administration
Therapeutics
Hypoglycemia
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Blood Glucose
Fasting
Body Weight
Blood Pressure
Kidney
Safety

Keywords

  • Canagliflozin dapagliflozin
  • Empagliflozin
  • Sodium glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors
  • Type 2 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems

Cite this

Glucose control and cardiovascular outcomes in clinical trials of sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor treatments in type 2 diabetes. / Oliveros, Rene A; Pham, Son V.; Bailey, Steven R; Chilton, Robert J.

In: European Endocrinology, Vol. 10, No. 2, 2014, p. 117-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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