Getting past "g": Testing a new model of dementing processes in persons without dementia

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Abstract

The cognitive correlates of functional status are essential to dementia case-finding. The authors have used structural-equation models to explicitly distinguish dementia-relevant variance in cognitive task performance (i.e., δ) from the variance that is unrelated to a dementing process (i.e., g′). Together, g′ and δ comprise Spearman's "g." Although δ represents only a small fraction of the total variance in cognitive task performance, it is more strongly associated with dementia severity than is g′. In this analysis, the authors test whether δ can predict future cognitive decline in persons clinically without dementia at baseline. These results have implications for the clinical assessment of dementia and suggest that functional status should assume a more important role.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-46
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

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Dementia
Task Performance and Analysis
Structural Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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