Geographic Differences in Sex and Racial Distributions Among Orthopaedic Surgery Residencies: Programs in the South Less Likely to Train Women and Minorities

Rajiv Rajani, Varan Haghshenas, Nnamdi Abalihi, Evan M. Tavakoli, Boris A. Zelle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Women and minorities have been reported to be underrepresented in orthopaedic residency programs. The main goal of this study was to describe the representation of women and minorities in orthopaedic surgery residency programs and to identify any geographic differences across the United States. Methods: Data for active residents within the United States during the academic year 2013 to 2014 were obtained from the American Medical Association. According to the US census method, the program regions were divided into Northeast, Midwest, South, and West. Results: The representation of female residents markedly varied by the geographic region with the lowest female representation in the South and the highest female representation in the West and the Northeast (P = 0.034). Orthopaedic residency programs in the South were less likely to include racial minorities, whereas racial minorities were more commonly represented in residency programs in the West and the Northeast (P< 0.001). Discussion: Our study demonstrates geographic differences in sex and minority representations in orthopaedic residency programs. Training programs in the South are less likely to train women and minorities compared with training programs in the West and the Northeast region. Both applicant-related factors and program-related factors may contribute to this finding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere004
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Global Research and Reviews
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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