Genetic variability in responses to caloric restriction in animals and in regulation of metabolism and obesity in humans.

D. B. Allison, R. A. Miller, S. N. Austad, C. Bouchard, R. Leibel, S. Klebanov, T. Johnson, D. E. Harrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Panel 5 focused on genetic factors that might mediate or moderate the effects of caloric restriction (CR) on longevity. Panel members stated that currently there is limited information directly addressing these issues. Therefore, they focused attention on what studies could be done. In addition, the panel believed that certain conceptual issues merited clarification and focused attention on this issue. Human studies and studies of nonhuman model organisms were discussed. The panel found at least three reasons why it would be valuable to find genes that influence the (putative) longevity-promoting effect of CR in humans. Such knowledge would offer: (a) the ability to predict individual responses to CR; (b) increased understanding of physiological mechanisms; and (c) the potential to develop mechanism-based interventions to promote longevity or healthy aging. In addition, the panel emphasized several macro-level recommendations regarding research strategies to avoid, research strategies to emphasize, and resources needing development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-65
Number of pages11
JournalThe journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences
Volume56 Spec No 1
StatePublished - Mar 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Caloric Restriction
Obesity
Research
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging

Cite this

Allison, D. B., Miller, R. A., Austad, S. N., Bouchard, C., Leibel, R., Klebanov, S., ... Harrison, D. E. (2001). Genetic variability in responses to caloric restriction in animals and in regulation of metabolism and obesity in humans. The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, 56 Spec No 1, 55-65.

Genetic variability in responses to caloric restriction in animals and in regulation of metabolism and obesity in humans. / Allison, D. B.; Miller, R. A.; Austad, S. N.; Bouchard, C.; Leibel, R.; Klebanov, S.; Johnson, T.; Harrison, D. E.

In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, Vol. 56 Spec No 1, 03.2001, p. 55-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Allison, DB, Miller, RA, Austad, SN, Bouchard, C, Leibel, R, Klebanov, S, Johnson, T & Harrison, DE 2001, 'Genetic variability in responses to caloric restriction in animals and in regulation of metabolism and obesity in humans.', The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, vol. 56 Spec No 1, pp. 55-65.
Allison, D. B. ; Miller, R. A. ; Austad, S. N. ; Bouchard, C. ; Leibel, R. ; Klebanov, S. ; Johnson, T. ; Harrison, D. E. / Genetic variability in responses to caloric restriction in animals and in regulation of metabolism and obesity in humans. In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences. 2001 ; Vol. 56 Spec No 1. pp. 55-65.
@article{b4ec759d6c744dfe996dd8fca4f9dfaf,
title = "Genetic variability in responses to caloric restriction in animals and in regulation of metabolism and obesity in humans.",
abstract = "Panel 5 focused on genetic factors that might mediate or moderate the effects of caloric restriction (CR) on longevity. Panel members stated that currently there is limited information directly addressing these issues. Therefore, they focused attention on what studies could be done. In addition, the panel believed that certain conceptual issues merited clarification and focused attention on this issue. Human studies and studies of nonhuman model organisms were discussed. The panel found at least three reasons why it would be valuable to find genes that influence the (putative) longevity-promoting effect of CR in humans. Such knowledge would offer: (a) the ability to predict individual responses to CR; (b) increased understanding of physiological mechanisms; and (c) the potential to develop mechanism-based interventions to promote longevity or healthy aging. In addition, the panel emphasized several macro-level recommendations regarding research strategies to avoid, research strategies to emphasize, and resources needing development.",
author = "Allison, {D. B.} and Miller, {R. A.} and Austad, {S. N.} and C. Bouchard and R. Leibel and S. Klebanov and T. Johnson and Harrison, {D. E.}",
year = "2001",
month = "3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "56 Spec No 1",
pages = "55--65",
journal = "Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences",
issn = "1079-5006",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic variability in responses to caloric restriction in animals and in regulation of metabolism and obesity in humans.

AU - Allison, D. B.

AU - Miller, R. A.

AU - Austad, S. N.

AU - Bouchard, C.

AU - Leibel, R.

AU - Klebanov, S.

AU - Johnson, T.

AU - Harrison, D. E.

PY - 2001/3

Y1 - 2001/3

N2 - Panel 5 focused on genetic factors that might mediate or moderate the effects of caloric restriction (CR) on longevity. Panel members stated that currently there is limited information directly addressing these issues. Therefore, they focused attention on what studies could be done. In addition, the panel believed that certain conceptual issues merited clarification and focused attention on this issue. Human studies and studies of nonhuman model organisms were discussed. The panel found at least three reasons why it would be valuable to find genes that influence the (putative) longevity-promoting effect of CR in humans. Such knowledge would offer: (a) the ability to predict individual responses to CR; (b) increased understanding of physiological mechanisms; and (c) the potential to develop mechanism-based interventions to promote longevity or healthy aging. In addition, the panel emphasized several macro-level recommendations regarding research strategies to avoid, research strategies to emphasize, and resources needing development.

AB - Panel 5 focused on genetic factors that might mediate or moderate the effects of caloric restriction (CR) on longevity. Panel members stated that currently there is limited information directly addressing these issues. Therefore, they focused attention on what studies could be done. In addition, the panel believed that certain conceptual issues merited clarification and focused attention on this issue. Human studies and studies of nonhuman model organisms were discussed. The panel found at least three reasons why it would be valuable to find genes that influence the (putative) longevity-promoting effect of CR in humans. Such knowledge would offer: (a) the ability to predict individual responses to CR; (b) increased understanding of physiological mechanisms; and (c) the potential to develop mechanism-based interventions to promote longevity or healthy aging. In addition, the panel emphasized several macro-level recommendations regarding research strategies to avoid, research strategies to emphasize, and resources needing development.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0002196182&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0002196182&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 56 Spec No 1

SP - 55

EP - 65

JO - Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

JF - Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

SN - 1079-5006

ER -