Genetic influence on the human brain

D. Reese McKay, Anderson M. Winkler, Peter Kochunov, Emma E M Knowles, Emma Sprooten, Peter T Fox, John Blangero, David C. Glahn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite rapid advancements and widespread interest, the field of imaging-genetics is neither mature nor secure. Although single-gene implications related to prevalent disorders continue to attract the lion’s share of attention, of far greater importance for the maturation and longevity of the field is an established foundation regarding how genes influence basic neuroscience. The genetic search space is finite and defined; the neuroscience component is anything but. Therefore, the greatest limitation is our ability to translate image-based features into neuroscientific phenotypes. The field will fully emerge only if laboratories capable of doing imaging-genetics research perceive the need to define fundamental neuroscience in terms of genetic elements. To make progress toward this overarching goal, there is urgent need for a systematic program of discovery based on genetic underpinnings of brain function. This chapter details the efforts of the Genetics of Brain Structure and Function (GOBS) project to build such a program of discovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGenome Mapping and Genomics in Human and Non-Human Primates
PublisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages247-258
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9783662463062, 9783662463055
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Neurosciences
Brain
brain
neurophysiology
Genes
Lions
Imaging techniques
Genetic Research
Genetic Structures
image analysis
Phenotype
Panthera leo
Genetics
genes
phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Reese McKay, D., Winkler, A. M., Kochunov, P., Knowles, E. E. M., Sprooten, E., Fox, P. T., ... Glahn, D. C. (2015). Genetic influence on the human brain. In Genome Mapping and Genomics in Human and Non-Human Primates (pp. 247-258). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-46306-2_13

Genetic influence on the human brain. / Reese McKay, D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Kochunov, Peter; Knowles, Emma E M; Sprooten, Emma; Fox, Peter T; Blangero, John; Glahn, David C.

Genome Mapping and Genomics in Human and Non-Human Primates. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2015. p. 247-258.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Reese McKay, D, Winkler, AM, Kochunov, P, Knowles, EEM, Sprooten, E, Fox, PT, Blangero, J & Glahn, DC 2015, Genetic influence on the human brain. in Genome Mapping and Genomics in Human and Non-Human Primates. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 247-258. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-46306-2_13
Reese McKay D, Winkler AM, Kochunov P, Knowles EEM, Sprooten E, Fox PT et al. Genetic influence on the human brain. In Genome Mapping and Genomics in Human and Non-Human Primates. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. 2015. p. 247-258 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-46306-2_13
Reese McKay, D. ; Winkler, Anderson M. ; Kochunov, Peter ; Knowles, Emma E M ; Sprooten, Emma ; Fox, Peter T ; Blangero, John ; Glahn, David C. / Genetic influence on the human brain. Genome Mapping and Genomics in Human and Non-Human Primates. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2015. pp. 247-258
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