Genetic Changes at the Glycoprotein Editing Site Associated with Serial Passage of Sudan Virus

Kendra J. Alfson, Laura E. Avena, Michael W. Beadles, Heather Menzie, Jean L. Patterson, Ricardo Carrion, Anthony Griffiths

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Sudan virus (SUDV), like the closely related Ebola virus (EBOV), is a filovirus that causes severe hemorrhagic disease. They both contain an RNA editing site in the glycoprotein gene that controls expression of soluble and full-length protein. We tested the consequences of cell culture passage on the genome sequence at the SUDV editing site locus and determined whether this affected virulence. Passage resulted in expansion of the SUDV editing site, similar to that observed with EBOV. We compared viruses possessing either the wild-type or expanded editing site, using a nonhuman primate model of disease. Despite differences in virus serum titer at one time point, there were no significant differences in time to death or any other measured parameter. These data imply that changes at this locus were not important for SUDV lethality.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)S295-S304
    JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
    Volume212
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

    Fingerprint

    Serial Passage
    Sudan
    Glycoproteins
    Viruses
    Ebolavirus
    Primate Diseases
    RNA Editing
    Viral Load
    Virulence
    Cell Culture Techniques
    Genome
    Gene Expression
    Serum
    Proteins

    Keywords

    • cell culture adaptation
    • editing site
    • glycoprotein
    • RNA editing
    • Sudan virus

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Infectious Diseases
    • Immunology and Allergy

    Cite this

    Alfson, K. J., Avena, L. E., Beadles, M. W., Menzie, H., Patterson, J. L., Carrion, R., & Griffiths, A. (2015). Genetic Changes at the Glycoprotein Editing Site Associated with Serial Passage of Sudan Virus. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 212, S295-S304. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiv216

    Genetic Changes at the Glycoprotein Editing Site Associated with Serial Passage of Sudan Virus. / Alfson, Kendra J.; Avena, Laura E.; Beadles, Michael W.; Menzie, Heather; Patterson, Jean L.; Carrion, Ricardo; Griffiths, Anthony.

    In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 212, 01.10.2015, p. S295-S304.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Alfson, KJ, Avena, LE, Beadles, MW, Menzie, H, Patterson, JL, Carrion, R & Griffiths, A 2015, 'Genetic Changes at the Glycoprotein Editing Site Associated with Serial Passage of Sudan Virus', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 212, pp. S295-S304. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiv216
    Alfson, Kendra J. ; Avena, Laura E. ; Beadles, Michael W. ; Menzie, Heather ; Patterson, Jean L. ; Carrion, Ricardo ; Griffiths, Anthony. / Genetic Changes at the Glycoprotein Editing Site Associated with Serial Passage of Sudan Virus. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2015 ; Vol. 212. pp. S295-S304.
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