Gene expression of the constant region of the heavy chain of immunoglobulin G (IgG CRHC) is down-regulated in human decidua in association with preeclampsia

K. A. Freed, S. P. Brennecke, E. K. Moses

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    3 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    An aberrant interaction at the maternal/fetal interface between the genetically distinct fetal trophoblast cells and cells of the maternal decidua has been proposed as an initiating factor in one of the major complications of human pregnancy, preeclampsia. Biochemical and epidemiological studies suggest that the immune system plays an important role in preeclampsia. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the decidual gene expression status in preeclampsia of one of the key components of the adaptive immune system. Total RNA was extracted from decidua collected from women with normal pregnancies and those complicated by preeclampsia. Reverse Northern analysis was performed on 72 cDNAs from human decidua and differentially expressed genes identified were analysed further using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis. Expression of the gene encoding the constant region of the heavy chain of immunoglobulin G (IgG CRHC) was shown to be down-regulated in association with preeclampsia. These data support the hypothesis that immune maladaptation may play an important role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)105-120
    Number of pages16
    JournalJournal of Reproductive Immunology
    Volume68
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

    Keywords

    • Antibody
    • Decidua
    • Immunology
    • Preeclampsia
    • Pregnancy
    • RNA

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Immunology and Allergy
    • Immunology
    • Reproductive Medicine
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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