Gender-associated differences in the development of 5-aminolevulinate synthase gene expression in the Harderian gland of Syrian hamsters

Carmen Rodriguez, Armando Menendez-Pelaez, Mary K. Vaughan, Russel J. Reiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The mRNA levels for aminolevulinate synthase (ALV-S), the rate-limiting enzyme in porphyrin synthesis, were studied in male and female Syrian hamsters during postnatal development. Sex-associated differences in the expression of ALV-S gene were evident at the end of the third week of postnatal development. Serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, cortisol, thyroid hormones and insulin-like growth factor were also studied in order to correlate their concentrations with the mRNA levels for ALV-S. Among these hormones, serum LH levels showed a positive correlation with the ALV-S mRNA levels. However, the expected negative correlation with testosterone levels was not clearly observed. Thus, in order to test the effects of testosterone on ALV-S gene expression, 11-day-old male and female Syrian hamsters and adult female hamsters were injected with 50 μg of testosterone for 4 days. Testosterone administration decreased the levels of ALV-S mRNA in the adult females but did not influence those of young females. The possible explanation for the insensitivity to testosterone during these postnatal stages might involve the maturational state of androgen receptors in the Harderian glands.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-173
Number of pages7
JournalMolecular and Cellular Endocrinology
Volume93
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1993

Keywords

  • 5-Aminolevulinate synthase
  • Development testosterone
  • Hamster
  • Harderian glands
  • Insulin-like growth factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Endocrinology

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