Fungal infection in the lung transplant recipient

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The incidence of fungal infections in lung transplant (LT) recipients is reported to be between 10% and 35%. This is significantly higher than the incidence of fungal infections in other solid-organ transplant recipients. Although both opportunistic and endemic fungal infections may be encountered after lung transplantation, Aspergillus and Candida are the most common organisms. The spectrum of Aspergillus infection includes Aspergillus tracheobronchitis, invasive Aspergillus, aspergilloma, and bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia in association with Aspergillus pneumonia. Aggressive therapy including the use of amphotericin, liposomal amphotericin, 5-fluorocytosine, azoles, and surgery may be required to successfully treat fungal infections in LT patients. This article reviews the presentation, diagnosis, and therapy of fungal infections in LT recipients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-133
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Pulmonary Medicine
Volume8
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2001

Fingerprint

Mycoses
Aspergillus
Lung
Amphotericin B
Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia
Transplants
Flucytosine
Azoles
Lung Transplantation
Incidence
Candida
Pneumonia
Transplant Recipients
Therapeutics
Infection

Keywords

  • Amphotericin B
  • Aspergillus
  • Azole agents
  • Candida
  • Lung transplant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Fungal infection in the lung transplant recipient. / Peters, Jay I; Levine, Stephanie M.

In: Clinical Pulmonary Medicine, Vol. 8, No. 3, 05.2001, p. 123-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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