Functional status of Mexican American nursing home residents

L. K. Chiodo, D. N. Kanten, M. B. Gerety, C. D. Mulrow, J. E. Cornell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To compare sociodemographic characteristics, physical function, and cognition of Mexican American and non-Hispanic white nursing home residents. Design and Setting: Cross-sectional survey of residents in eight proprietary nursing homes and one Veterans Affairs nursing home in San Antonio, Texas. Subjects: Residents with lengths of stay greater than or equal to 90 days. Measurements: Sociodemographic characteristics, residence prior to admission, and dependency in activities of daily living (ADL) were abstracted from the medical record. The Folstein Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was administered in the resident's self-selected language to a subset of residents. Main Results: There were 1160 participants, 261 Mexican American (23%) and 899 non-Hispanic white residents (77%). Mexican Americans were younger (77.1 vs 80.7 years), more often men (44% vs 30%), less educated (6.2 vs 10.8 years), and more often dependent on Medicaid funding (66% vs 40%) than non-Hispanic whites. Mexican Americans were less independent in feeding (34% vs 49%), transfers (18% vs 30%), toileting (19% vs 29%), and dressing (12% vs 19%). Mean MMSE scores were different in Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites (8.93 vs 11.85), and this difference remained significant after adjustment for age and education (P = 0.04). ADL function was strongly associated with MMSE (P = 0.0001) and less strongly associated with ethnicity (P = 0.056) in multiple regression analysis. Conclusions: This study provides the strongest evidence to date that Mexican American nursing home residents are more cognitively and functionally impaired than non-Hispanic white residents. Further studies should explore whether medical conditions, selection and referral patterns or cultural factors explain functional differences between Mexican American and non-Hispanic white nursing home residents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-296
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume42
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1994

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Nursing Homes
Activities of Daily Living
Medicaid
Veterans
Bandages
Cognition
Medical Records
Length of Stay
Language
Referral and Consultation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Chiodo, L. K., Kanten, D. N., Gerety, M. B., Mulrow, C. D., & Cornell, J. E. (1994). Functional status of Mexican American nursing home residents. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 42(3), 293-296.

Functional status of Mexican American nursing home residents. / Chiodo, L. K.; Kanten, D. N.; Gerety, M. B.; Mulrow, C. D.; Cornell, J. E.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 42, No. 3, 1994, p. 293-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chiodo, LK, Kanten, DN, Gerety, MB, Mulrow, CD & Cornell, JE 1994, 'Functional status of Mexican American nursing home residents', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 293-296.
Chiodo LK, Kanten DN, Gerety MB, Mulrow CD, Cornell JE. Functional status of Mexican American nursing home residents. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 1994;42(3):293-296.
Chiodo, L. K. ; Kanten, D. N. ; Gerety, M. B. ; Mulrow, C. D. ; Cornell, J. E. / Functional status of Mexican American nursing home residents. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 1994 ; Vol. 42, No. 3. pp. 293-296.
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