Functional assessment of intrahypothalamic implants of immortalized gonadotropin-releasing hormone-secreting cells in female hypogonadal mice

Gregory M. Miller, Ann Judith Silverman, James L. Roberts, Ke Wen Dong, Marie J. Gibson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The hypogonadal (HPG) mouse is a mutant that lacks a functional gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) gene. In this study, female HPG mice received bilateral intrahypothalamic implants of an immortalized GnRH-secreting cell line (GT1-7). Nine mice were tested 42-65 days after implantation to determine whether these cells could support spontaneous and/or N-methyl-d,l-aspartic acid (NMDA)-stimulated luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. When sampled via intravenous catheters, four mice had measurable LH secretion. Three of these mice responded to NMDA challenges with significant increases in circulating LH. GnRH immunocytochemistry revealed that GT1-7 cells were present in these four mice and three others in which LH values were not detectable. There were about 1200 GnRH cells dispersed within the piriform cortex and olfactory tubercle, and no tumor found in one of the HPG mice that responded to NMDA, whereas the other NMDA responders had large bilateral hypothalamic tumors. The presence or absence of such tumors did not predict the capacity to respond to the NMDA challenge with alterations in LH secretion. This study provides the first evidence that intrahypothalamic GT1-7 cells can support LH release in the HPG mouse, and that this secretion can be modified by pharmacological agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-257
Number of pages7
JournalCell Transplantation
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cell line
  • GnRH
  • Graft
  • NMDA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Cell Biology
  • Transplantation

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