Food intake and the menstrual cycle: A retrospective analysis, with implications for appetite research

Rochelle Buffenstein, Sally D. Poppitt, Regina M. McDevitt, Andrew M. Prentice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

176 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The biological regulation of appetite is currently an important topic in nutrition, since hyperphagia has been implicated as the prime cause of obesity. Cyclical fluctuations in food intake occur in women across the menstrual cycle, with a periovulatory nadir and a peak in the luteal phase. These alterations in food intake, in response to ovarian steroid hormone changes may be more than 2.5 MJ/day, with the mean reported changes shown in 19 separate studies of 1.0 MJ/day. Hormonal induced fluctuations in food intake could, therefore, contribute to energy imbalance and consequent weight gain. Further, in nutrition studies involving women subjects where the menstrual cycle phase is not controlled, hormonally induced changes in food selection and intake may mask the often considerably smaller changes in response to experimental variables in appetite research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1067-1077
Number of pages11
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume58
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Appetite
Menstrual Cycle
Eating
Research
Appetite Regulation
Food Preferences
Hyperphagia
Luteal Phase
Masks
Weight Gain
Obesity
Steroids
Hormones

Keywords

  • Appetite
  • Energy intake
  • Fat selection
  • Food intake
  • Hormonal change
  • Menstrual cycle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Food intake and the menstrual cycle : A retrospective analysis, with implications for appetite research. / Buffenstein, Rochelle; Poppitt, Sally D.; McDevitt, Regina M.; Prentice, Andrew M.

In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 58, No. 6, 1995, p. 1067-1077.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buffenstein, Rochelle ; Poppitt, Sally D. ; McDevitt, Regina M. ; Prentice, Andrew M. / Food intake and the menstrual cycle : A retrospective analysis, with implications for appetite research. In: Physiology and Behavior. 1995 ; Vol. 58, No. 6. pp. 1067-1077.
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