Focus group discussions in community-based participatory research to inform the development of a human papillomavirus (HPV) educational intervention for Latinas in San Diego

Jessica L. Barnack-Tavlaris, Luz Garcini, Olga Sanchez, Irma Hernandez, Ana M. Navarro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of formative focus groups as a community-based participatory research (CBPR) method in developing cancer education programs. Two focus groups were conducted according to CBPR principles, in order to develop a community-competent human papillomavirus (HPV)/cervical cancer educational program for Latinas living in the USA/Mexico border region. Focus group participants were 18 female Mexican American community health advisors. Participants reported that there is limited information and many myths about HPV and the vaccine in the Latino/Latina community, along with many barriers to acceptance of HPV/cervical cancer-related information. Furthermore, participants discussed their recommendations for the development of a culturally appropriate HPV educational program. From these data, we have a better understanding of the HPV/cervical cancer educational approach that will be most accepted in the community and what key information needs to be provided to women who participate in the program, which reinforces the importance of the CBPR approach to the formative phase of cancer education program development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)784-789
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer
  • Community-based participatory research
  • HPV
  • HPV vaccine
  • Latinas

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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