Final report of the safety assessment of kojic acid as used in cosmetics

Christina L. Burnett, Wilma F. Bergfeld, Donald V. Belsito, Ronald A. Hill, Curtis D. Klaassen, Daniel C. Liebler, James G. Marks, Ronald C. Shank, Thomas J Slaga, Paul W. Snyder, F. Alan Andersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Kojic acid functions as an antioxidant in cosmetic products. Kojic acid was not a toxicant in acute, chronic, reproductive, and genotoxicity studies. While some animal data suggested tumor promotion and weak carcinogenicity, kojic acid is slowly absorbed into the circulation from human skin and likely would not reach the threshold at which these effects were seen. The available human sensitization data supported the safety of kojic acid at a use concentration of 2% in leave-on cosmetics. Kojic acid depigmented black guinea pig skin at a concentration of 4%, but this effect was not seen at 1%. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel concluded that the 2 end points of concern, dermal sensitization and skin lightening, would not be seen at use concentrations below 1%; therefore, this ingredient is safe for use in cosmetic products up to that level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Toxicology
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cosmetics
Safety
Skin
Tumors
Guinea Pigs
Animals
Antioxidants
kojic acid
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • cosmetics
  • kojic acid
  • safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

Cite this

Burnett, C. L., Bergfeld, W. F., Belsito, D. V., Hill, R. A., Klaassen, C. D., Liebler, D. C., ... Andersen, F. A. (2010). Final report of the safety assessment of kojic acid as used in cosmetics. International Journal of Toxicology, 29(6). https://doi.org/10.1177/1091581810385956

Final report of the safety assessment of kojic acid as used in cosmetics. / Burnett, Christina L.; Bergfeld, Wilma F.; Belsito, Donald V.; Hill, Ronald A.; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Marks, James G.; Shank, Ronald C.; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W.; Andersen, F. Alan.

In: International Journal of Toxicology, Vol. 29, No. 6, 11.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burnett, CL, Bergfeld, WF, Belsito, DV, Hill, RA, Klaassen, CD, Liebler, DC, Marks, JG, Shank, RC, Slaga, TJ, Snyder, PW & Andersen, FA 2010, 'Final report of the safety assessment of kojic acid as used in cosmetics', International Journal of Toxicology, vol. 29, no. 6. https://doi.org/10.1177/1091581810385956
Burnett, Christina L. ; Bergfeld, Wilma F. ; Belsito, Donald V. ; Hill, Ronald A. ; Klaassen, Curtis D. ; Liebler, Daniel C. ; Marks, James G. ; Shank, Ronald C. ; Slaga, Thomas J ; Snyder, Paul W. ; Andersen, F. Alan. / Final report of the safety assessment of kojic acid as used in cosmetics. In: International Journal of Toxicology. 2010 ; Vol. 29, No. 6.
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