Factors influencing care seeking for a self-defined worst panic attack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Medical care is sought by only 60% of individuals who experience panic attacks, many of whom seek treatment at the emergency department. In this study, the treatment-seeking patterns of community-dwelling persons who experienced panic attacks were documented, and factors leading to care seeking were studied. Method: Ninety-seven communitydwelling adults who met DSM-III-R criteria for panic attacks were randomly selected to undergo in-depth structured interviews, in which they were asked whether they had considered using or had actually used medical (general or mental health), alternative, and/or family sources of care at the time of theirworst attack. Results: Use of general medical or mental health sources was contemplated by 77 participants (79%) and actually undergone by 50 participants (52%). More participants contemplated using general medical sites (72%) than mental health sites (27%). with use of emergency departments considered by 43% and family physicians' offices, by 34%; other sources of care, including friends or family members, alternative sites, and self-treatment, were considered less often. Some sources, such us ambulances, family members, and self-treatment, were readily used once contemplated. Access or barriers to treatment, perception of symptoms and of the reasons for the panic attack, and family-related variables were significantly associated with whether care seeking was contemplated. Conclusion: Use of mental health sites was rarely contemplated after a panic attack among study participants. The reasons that sufferers of panic attacks fail to seek treatment or seek treatment from non-mental health sources may be determined through further study of care seeking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82
Number of pages1
JournalPrimary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume4
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Panic Disorder
Mental Health
Therapeutics
Hospital Emergency Service
Independent Living
Physicians' Offices
Ambulances
Family Physicians
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Interviews
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "Factors influencing care seeking for a self-defined worst panic attack",
abstract = "Objective: Medical care is sought by only 60{\%} of individuals who experience panic attacks, many of whom seek treatment at the emergency department. In this study, the treatment-seeking patterns of community-dwelling persons who experienced panic attacks were documented, and factors leading to care seeking were studied. Method: Ninety-seven communitydwelling adults who met DSM-III-R criteria for panic attacks were randomly selected to undergo in-depth structured interviews, in which they were asked whether they had considered using or had actually used medical (general or mental health), alternative, and/or family sources of care at the time of theirworst attack. Results: Use of general medical or mental health sources was contemplated by 77 participants (79{\%}) and actually undergone by 50 participants (52{\%}). More participants contemplated using general medical sites (72{\%}) than mental health sites (27{\%}). with use of emergency departments considered by 43{\%} and family physicians' offices, by 34{\%}; other sources of care, including friends or family members, alternative sites, and self-treatment, were considered less often. Some sources, such us ambulances, family members, and self-treatment, were readily used once contemplated. Access or barriers to treatment, perception of symptoms and of the reasons for the panic attack, and family-related variables were significantly associated with whether care seeking was contemplated. Conclusion: Use of mental health sites was rarely contemplated after a panic attack among study participants. The reasons that sufferers of panic attacks fail to seek treatment or seek treatment from non-mental health sources may be determined through further study of care seeking.",
author = "Katerndahl, {David A}",
year = "2002",
language = "English (US)",
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journal = "The primary care companion for CNS disorders",
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AB - Objective: Medical care is sought by only 60% of individuals who experience panic attacks, many of whom seek treatment at the emergency department. In this study, the treatment-seeking patterns of community-dwelling persons who experienced panic attacks were documented, and factors leading to care seeking were studied. Method: Ninety-seven communitydwelling adults who met DSM-III-R criteria for panic attacks were randomly selected to undergo in-depth structured interviews, in which they were asked whether they had considered using or had actually used medical (general or mental health), alternative, and/or family sources of care at the time of theirworst attack. Results: Use of general medical or mental health sources was contemplated by 77 participants (79%) and actually undergone by 50 participants (52%). More participants contemplated using general medical sites (72%) than mental health sites (27%). with use of emergency departments considered by 43% and family physicians' offices, by 34%; other sources of care, including friends or family members, alternative sites, and self-treatment, were considered less often. Some sources, such us ambulances, family members, and self-treatment, were readily used once contemplated. Access or barriers to treatment, perception of symptoms and of the reasons for the panic attack, and family-related variables were significantly associated with whether care seeking was contemplated. Conclusion: Use of mental health sites was rarely contemplated after a panic attack among study participants. The reasons that sufferers of panic attacks fail to seek treatment or seek treatment from non-mental health sources may be determined through further study of care seeking.

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